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Thread: How does your dry fly sit?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,078

    Default How does your dry fly sit?

    As a self confessed nympho maniac, I probably have not thought about my dry flies as much as I should have done.
    When it comes to nymph fishing, or sub surface fishing for trout, mostly, my brain works overtime.
    I have dabbled with the 2 dimensional fishing a bit, but no where as much as with nymphs.
    I have even created a dry fly, that have saved the day for me on a couple of occasions.
    http://www.flytalk.co.za/forum/showt...F-amp-K-Caddis
    The F&K was created after visit by the Czech fly fishers and lots of chats with my Italian friends.
    After the visit of Pascal Cognard, I have definitely spent more time fishing dry flies and even having lots of fun with the it.
    http://www.flytalk.co.za/forum/showt...Possum-Tabanas
    What made the Tabanas special, was the way it sat in the water.
    The F&K, was cutting thru the surface film and the Tabanas, was basically sitting in the surface film.

    Lately, I have been trying to find all the info about flies and the footprint, the origins of the flies, etc.
    If you have any info, please post it here.

    But I have started to think differently about dry flies and the way they "sit" on the water.
    AK best wrote in his one book, how his flies become more effective by changing the hackling.
    In the Cape, the Spun dun is a very popular fly, probably because it sits "in the surface film"
    I am also looking at the Parachute flies, with different "eyes"

    Having read lots of books over the years, a lot of the info was floating around. But it is amazing how, NOW, after discussions with Pascal and Said, in a couple of weeks, all the data, is starting to come together.
    For the average dry fly fisher, you probably know all of this. Or have you really thought about how your dry fly sits in or on the water?
    Last edited by Korrie; 28-05-13 at 08:25 PM.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    As a self confessed nympho maniac, I probably have not thought about my dry flies as much as I should have done.
    When it comes to nymph fishing, or sub surface fishing for trout, mostly, my brain works overtime.
    I have dabbled with the 2 dimensional fishing a bit, but no where as much as with nymphs.
    I have even created a dry fly, that have saved the day for me on a couple of occasions.
    http://www.flytalk.co.za/forum/showt...F-amp-K-Caddis
    The F&K was created after visit by the Czech fly fishers and lots of chats with my Italian friends.
    After the visit of Pascal Cognard, I have definitely spent more time fishing dry flies and even having lots of fun with the it.
    http://www.flytalk.co.za/forum/showt...Possum-Tabanas
    What made the Tabanas special, was the way it sat in the water.
    The F&K, was cutting thru the surface film and the Tabanas, was basically sitting in the surface film.

    Lately, I have been trying to find all the info about flies and the footprint, the origins of the flies, etc.
    If you have any info, please post it here.

    But I have started to think differently about dry flies and the way they "sit" on the water.
    AK best wrote in his one book, how his flies become more effective by changing the hackling.
    In the Cape, the Spun dun is a very popular fly, probably because it sits "in the surface film"
    I am also looking at the Parachute flies, with different "eyes"

    Having read lots of books over the years, a lot of the info was floating around. But it is amazing how, NOW, after discussions with Pascal and Said, in a couple of weeks, all the data, is starting to come together.
    For the average dry fly fisher, you probably know all of this. Or have you really thought about how your dry fly sits in or on the water?
    Korrie

    I have thought about this quite a lot and the Klondike was the latest fly in an ongoing mutation of my favourite dry flies. I must say that this fly is one of the flies with the best "presence" on/in the water to come from my vice. I will ad a pic when I have a chance.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,078

    Default

    Hi CHris

    Please post a photo and recipe.
    What was interesting for me, with the Pascal and Said, is that they had 3 "models" of a fly, if they knew that a specific fly was abundant on a certain river. Each model, sitting different on/in the water.
    I wonder how many Local fly fishers have 3 models of the same fly?
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    Hi CHris

    Please post a photo and recipe.
    What was interesting for me, with the Pascal and Said, is that they had 3 "models" of a fly, if they knew that a specific fly was abundant on a certain river. Each model, sitting different on/in the water.
    I wonder how many Local fly fishers have 3 models of the same fly?
    It's depends what stage of the hatch you are trying to imitate. Emerger, dun, spinner, cripple, spent spinner etc. Each of the stages will sit in a different part of the surface of the water. It's not rocket science ;-)
    “Apparently people don't like the truth, but I do like it; I like it because it upsets a lot of people. If you show them enough times that their arguments are bullshit, then maybe just once, one of them will say, 'Oh! Wait a minute - I was wrong.' I live for that happening. Rare, I assure you” ― Lemmy Kilmister

    Reap the Whirlwind - WM

    Paradise = A 3wt Rod & a fist full of someone else's #32 parachutes

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,078

    Default

    For an esteemed dry fly fisher like you, it is probably common sense.

    But do you have 3 different adult patterns that is tied to sit 3 different ways, and not only one pattern, or different patterns, imitating the different life stages.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  6. Default

    Korrie, I know that you are loathe to read Bob Wyatt's 2 books, but just try it - dry fly fishing (actually more emerger fishing, or DHE to be even MORE specific) might just change from being 2-dimensional to being 2.1 dimensional
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    But do you have 3 different adult patterns that is tied to sit 3 different ways, and not only one pattern, or different patterns, imitating the different life stages.
    Are you talking about 3 different stages for the adult (1 phase) or a different pattern for the each of the 3 stages after the nymphal stage (emerger, dun, spinner)?
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    For an esteemed dry fly fisher like you, it is probably common sense.

    But do you have 3 different adult patterns that is tied to sit 3 different ways, and not only one pattern, or different patterns, imitating the different life stages.
    I am not an esteemed dry fly fisher as you put it. I am simply a fisherman who does not confine myself to a single technique or way of fishing and claim that as best. Yes I do have more than 3 patterns to imitate the different stages of hatch. Unweighted nymph fished in the film, CDC loop wing emerger fished slightly higher, CDC dun higher still, Catskill style dry to imitate returning spinners which sits just on tips on the surface and spent spinner patterns which again sit in the film. Same for caddis and midges, just fewer stages of the life cycle to imitate. Any half decent book you read on fly tying will give you the same options hence my comment about not being rocket science. Do we need to get that technical on the Cape streams? Not very often although I have had the odd day when a small Catskill style dry was the only thing the fish would eat when spinners were returning to the water and lower riding patterns were ignored.
    “Apparently people don't like the truth, but I do like it; I like it because it upsets a lot of people. If you show them enough times that their arguments are bullshit, then maybe just once, one of them will say, 'Oh! Wait a minute - I was wrong.' I live for that happening. Rare, I assure you” ― Lemmy Kilmister

    Reap the Whirlwind - WM

    Paradise = A 3wt Rod & a fist full of someone else's #32 parachutes

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    For an esteemed dry fly fisher like you, it is probably common sense.

    But do you have 3 different adult patterns that is tied to sit 3 different ways, and not only one pattern, or different patterns, imitating the different life stages.
    You can hackle them differently (above the thorax or below the thorax as an example when tying parachutes) or use different materials or tying techniques to achieve different "sink rates". Whether you tie the same pattern three different ways to achieve the "sink rate" you require or just use a purpose designed pattern is pretty irrelevant - I doubt the fish are going to be that specific. As Mario says, you should read Bob Watts books for some interesting opinions on the matter. There is no right or wrong answer, if there was then you would be winning every provincial and national competition that you entered - which you aren't. You can make your tying and fishing as simple or as complicated as you like - as long as you are getting enjoyment out of it. What was apparent with Pascal is that he doesn't do anything fancy, he just does the basics extremely well!
    “Apparently people don't like the truth, but I do like it; I like it because it upsets a lot of people. If you show them enough times that their arguments are bullshit, then maybe just once, one of them will say, 'Oh! Wait a minute - I was wrong.' I live for that happening. Rare, I assure you” ― Lemmy Kilmister

    Reap the Whirlwind - WM

    Paradise = A 3wt Rod & a fist full of someone else's #32 parachutes

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Blouberg
    Posts
    1,745

    Default

    Agree totally with Darryl. Dry fly fishing in the WC streams is not rocket science. One thing that I try and achieve is a totally drag free drift. I think presentation, drag free drift and selecting where to cast are the key elements. Fly choice (for me anyway), not so important. I could happily fish with a black Klinkhammer style fly or CDC caddis as my only two flies and I will do ok.

    On the question that Korrie poses - I think that using a dropper below the dry upsets the drift of the dry and makes it less effective. Micro-currents acting on the nymph disturb the dry above.

    This is for the WC streams. When I fished the Henry's Fork of the Snake it was a totally different animal! You had to match the hatch and stage of the hatch perfectly. Problem was, there was usually two or three hatches coming off simultaneously and the trout would key onto one of these and then,as a subset, a certain stage of the hatch. Downstream dead drift was also the only way to fish due to fast laminar flow and leader shy fish. Accurate puddle casts were required. Challenging stuff. Especially as some of the flies were really tiny and almost impossible to see on the water.

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