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Thread: Fishing bloodworm imitations?

  1. #1

    Default Fishing bloodworm imitations?

    Hi guys

    On the weekend found a lot of bloodworms in the dam.If im not mistaken the san juan worm is a good imitation.
    How exactly would one fish this pattern in a stillwater?

    thanks in advance...

  2. #2
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    Static under an indicator, or on a sloooooowwww retrieve (either a floating or slow intermediate works well). I usually add a small nymph to help get the SJ worm down.
    You are a perishable item. Live accordingly.

  3. #3
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    Blood worms are the larvae state of the chironomids.
    The pupae state is the "buzzer" state, which is an important fly for still waters.
    So, you can fish blood worms, but a buzzers is the next phase, which is also good to have in your box
    http://www.gvsu.edu/cms3/assets/6BED...ual/fig_12.gif
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  4. #4

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    how would you fish these patterns korrie?Under a dry?

  5. #5
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    Depends on the water depth etc.
    Under a dry.
    or a floating line, with long leader setup- up to 20 feet, to cover the depth the fish is feeding at.
    slow sinking intermediate with a booby on the point, mid water column
    or a fast sinking line with booby on point and the buzzers on 1st and 2nd dropper.
    The booby lifts the buzzers from the bottom and you have the flies at different depths.

    Some fly fishers do not realize how long it takes for a line to sink to a specific depth.

    If a dam is 8meters deep.
    a DI 3 will take 104 seconds to reach the bottom.
    a DI 5 will take 62 seconds to reach the bottom.
    a DI 7 will take 45 seconds to reach the bottom.

    So if the bloodworms emerge from the muddy bottom, and is just above the bottom, how many guys wait that long before they start to slowly pull the buzzers?
    add a bobby to the point, the sink rate is even slower.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  6. #6
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    Ok this might be a bit weird, but i have come up with a San Juan worm variation that i developed after reading an article by Gary La Fontaine about fishing a pattern of his called a Rollover Scud. The idea of his Scud pattern was to weight it on the top half of the fly, so that when it is sinking, it sinks upside down. He found though that when retrieved, the fly uprights itself before moving forward, and as soon as he stops retrieving, the fly returns to the upside down state.

    Now imagine a natural bloodworm in the water - you often see them in stagnant pools with the tips of the worm kicking to try to move around. I took the idea of the Rollover Scud, and before tying the San Juan worm in the traditional manner, i layed one piece of lead along the top edge of the shank then continued with the traditional tie.

    The fly has the exact same effect in the water as the rollover scud - resting state is upside down but as soon as you strip, it uprights itself, and this gives the affect of the head and tail parts of the chenille kicking as you make the short strips.

    This fly has worked very well for me in dams with lots of bloodworm, so if you tie your own (and it is very easy to tie these on your own) you could add the lead to get that extra kicking effect.

    Let it sink to the depths and then do short strips of 1 or 2 inches to get the fly to flip up and down all along the retrieve, giving it that nice kicking action all the way along.
    "So hereís my point. Donít go and get your ego all out of proportion because you can tie a fly and catch a fish thatís dumb enough to eat a car key.." - Louis Cahill - Gink and Gasoline

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by gkieser View Post
    Ok this might be a bit weird, but i have come up with a San Juan worm variation that i developed after reading an article by Gary La Fontaine about fishing a pattern of his called a Rollover Scud. The idea of his Scud pattern was to weight it on the top half of the fly, so that when it is sinking, it sinks upside down. He found though that when retrieved, the fly uprights itself before moving forward, and as soon as he stops retrieving, the fly returns to the upside down state.

    Now imagine a natural bloodworm in the water - you often see them in stagnant pools with the tips of the worm kicking to try to move around. I took the idea of the Rollover Scud, and before tying the San Juan worm in the traditional manner, i layed one piece of lead along the top edge of the shank then continued with the traditional tie.

    The fly has the exact same effect in the water as the rollover scud - resting state is upside down but as soon as you strip, it uprights itself, and this gives the affect of the head and tail parts of the chenille kicking as you make the short strips.

    This fly has worked very well for me in dams with lots of bloodworm, so if you tie your own (and it is very easy to tie these on your own) you could add the lead to get that extra kicking effect.

    Let it sink to the depths and then do short strips of 1 or 2 inches to get the fly to flip up and down all along the retrieve, giving it that nice kicking action all the way along.
    Very interesting,
    Do you fish it with a floating line? Single fly only?
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  8. #8
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    no usually fished deep on a sinking line, and have had success on it's own or with other flies. The retrieve lends itself to dragonfly nymphs movements too so would be a good combo to have both moving in a natural way at the same time.
    "So hereís my point. Donít go and get your ego all out of proportion because you can tie a fly and catch a fish thatís dumb enough to eat a car key.." - Louis Cahill - Gink and Gasoline

  9. #9

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    can you guys recommend a good buzzer pattern and what sizes?

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