Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 41 to 49 of 49

Thread: Looking to buy a rod

  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Gauteng
    Posts
    71

    Default

    Im just curious cause on yellowstone angler shootout someone commented that the 5wt Bvk is actually in their mind, a 6wt rod? But I hear you, I,ll just trust the wt on the rod from now on, and live with it. Ta

    Sent from my LG-D370 using Tapatalk
    Greys

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Western Cape
    Posts
    7,613

    Default

    I hear you, and personally, I agree. bear a few things in mind though. When you talk of a rod being a 6wt , for instance, what you actually mean, is that the rod is rated for a 6 wt line. Rods are categorised according to the line weight that the manufacturer recommends will perform best at the rods intended specification. Rod themselves do not have a weight rating, but go according to their line weight. So, what we should really be saying instead of , " its a 6wt rod".... is that, "its a rod rated for a 6wt line". Ok, now that we have that understood, its fine to choose a line for the rod that is not the line weight that the manufacturer reccomemds for optimum performance. all we do by using a heavier or lighter line, is changing the rods action. Think about aerialising more line in the cast. That would mean more line out the tip, thus heavier, thus a slower casting stroke. Also very heavy flies have an effect. if you are fishing with multiple heavy flies, you will also have an effect of slowing the rod down.
    A very fast rod , is made this way for a purpose. To shoot line with as few false casts as possible, you need a fast rod, so the BVK is designed to make one or two false casts, a quick haul, and then a shoot, and it does it well. there are several other rods that do this, the Sage TCR, TCX ranges are also very fast rods designed for this. Basically if you don't need to be doing this type of casting, then by all means try a heavier line for slower more delicate work, but if a manufacturer says its a rod rated for a 6wt line, its probably worth looking at the reasons why they give it this rating. If the rod doesn't perform according to your requirements with the recommended line, then the chances are that you bought the wrong rod for the application.
    Quote Originally Posted by Navi View Post
    Im just curious cause on yellowstone angler shootout someone commented that the 5wt Bvk is actually in their mind, a 6wt rod? But I hear you, I,ll just trust the wt on the rod from now on, and live with it. Ta

    Sent from my LG-D370 using Tapatalk
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Gauteng
    Posts
    71

    Default

    Very good reply, thank you.
    Yes I read somewhere, that each line wt class is has a wt range. Maybe choosing the higher wt(grains)in a specific wt range could be a small part of the solution as well?
    How much wt difference from the bottom of wt scale to the top anyway, significant or not?


    Sent from my LG-D370 using Tapatalk
    Greys

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Western Cape
    Posts
    107
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Andre,
    I absolutely agree, we tend to fish too heavy for stillwaters.
    What rod weights are generally used for Lakies? I'm always of the opinion that we fish too heavy. During my 1st few outings at Thrift and other Queenstown and Tarka venues I fished a 6wt. However, with the fast action rods these days like my 5wt Bomber which I even use for estuary leeries and kob, a 6 weight is not necessary. These lighter rods are also doing well with fast sink lines.

    Interested to compare rod sizes, 'pardon the pun'. I am of the opinion that a 4 weight for Cape Town still water areas are more than sufficient.
    Your comments.
    Anyone with comments as Andre has already given his.
    Korrie - what do you use for Lakies?

    Pierre

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,078

    Default

    Hi
    sorry only see this post now.
    I have a #6 and #7 for Lakies.
    Use the same set of lines on both rods.
    The actions are different and hardly notice the line weight difference on the 2 rods.
    Depending with whom I fish on the boat, left or right and the wind, I fish the different rods.
    Each gives me a different sense of enjoyment and fishing fun.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Western Cape
    Posts
    107
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    Hi
    sorry only see this post now.
    I have a #6 and #7 for Lakies.
    Use the same set of lines on both rods.
    The actions are different and hardly notice the line weight difference on the 2 rods.
    Depending with whom I fish on the boat, left or right and the wind, I fish the different rods.
    Each gives me a different sense of enjoyment and fishing fun.
    Hi Korrie,
    That is extremely interesting that you would fish so heavy (in my opinion). Is this due to multiple flies and/or large flies?
    I would have thought that a 6 weight rod is only necessary in the EC where the fish are much larger? Do you not feel that the fish are absolutely over powered by the heavy line drag in the water due to the heavy weight?

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,078

    Default

    When you fish a 20 foot leader with 3 heavily weighted Goldilocks, you need the power.

    And sometimes it is not what is the "right" rod, it is what gives you pleasure or what you enjoy to do for that day.

    With the bigger rods, the false casting is a lot less, so you are fresher at the end of the day.
    On the hang, with a 11" foot rod, you can do a lot more than with a 9" foot rod etc.

    I am looking at building an ESN #5 10" for the still waters as well,
    I think it will be a fantastic rod for small nymphs, buzzer fishing etc on still waters.
    I have tried an ESN on a windy day, in small grass field, not 100% sure if it is right.
    I want to go to a dam for a day, try the ESN #5 and one or 2 other rods in same lenght and weight, then compare it.
    Only then will I make a decision.
    But somehow my gut feel says, it could be a super option.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Western Cape
    Posts
    107
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Interesting take, but very true. However, I do not fish much from a boat, however the same will apply from the float tube.

    I also agree that I derive immense pleasure from a nice casting rod.It's like hitting a sweet 5 iron. I like your take on the total experience. Due to the lack of time available it is always about catching fish and I have forgotten to take in the total experience. Time to change my focus and change the 'KPI's' that I measure a good day on the water by.



    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    When you fish a 20 foot leader with 3 heavily weighted Goldilocks, you need the power.

    And sometimes it is not what is the "right" rod, it is what gives you pleasure or what you enjoy to do for that day.

    With the bigger rods, the false casting is a lot less, so you are fresher at the end of the day.
    On the hang, with a 11" foot rod, you can do a lot more than with a 9" foot rod etc.

    I am looking at building an ESN #5 10" for the still waters as well,
    I think it will be a fantastic rod for small nymphs, buzzer fishing etc on still waters.
    I have tried an ESN on a windy day, in small grass field, not 100% sure if it is right.
    I want to go to a dam for a day, try the ESN #5 and one or 2 other rods in same lenght and weight, then compare it.
    Only then will I make a decision.
    But somehow my gut feel says, it could be a super option.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    127

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    When you fish a 20 foot leader with 3 heavily weighted Goldilocks, you need the power.

    And sometimes it is not what is the "right" rod, it is what gives you pleasure or what you enjoy to do for that day.

    With the bigger rods, the false casting is a lot less, so you are fresher at the end of the day.
    On the hang, with a 11" foot rod, you can do a lot more than with a 9" foot rod etc.

    I am looking at building an ESN #5 10" for the still waters as well,
    I think it will be a fantastic rod for small nymphs, buzzer fishing etc on still waters.
    I have tried an ESN on a windy day, in small grass field, not 100% sure if it is right.
    I want to go to a dam for a day, try the ESN #5 and one or 2 other rods in same lenght and weight, then compare it.
    Only then will I make a decision.
    But somehow my gut feel says, it could be a super option.
    Korrie are you not tempted to look at UK rod designs (Hardy / Greys) - they totally understand this modern loch-style? When I lived there the gold standard was a 10' 7wt GLX for most stillwater fishing and a 6wt for nymphs and buzzers.

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •