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Thread: Difference between 5/6wt and 5 wt

  1. #11

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    Are you then suggesting that a dual rated rod is therefore technically superior.
    I stand by my personal opinion.
    As a know-it-all you should know better, so you must be correct.
    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    I don't think any rod manufacturer is going to advertise to the world that they are complete idiots and don't know how to design rods.
    Read up and you will find quite a lot of information to back up my explanation. I would expect you as a tackle dealer to know a little more about such an elementary subject. Dual rated rods, are designed to be used with more than one line weight, dependent on the fishing application. Its not guess work on the part of the manufacturer. Yes, it is more common in low priced rods, this being because the rod is targeted at the budget conscious fly fisherman who can afford one rod, not two, so needs his one rod to be able to operate effectively over a broader range of fishing situations.
    Regards
    Craig

  2. #12
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    The duel rating also had to do with showing buyers what line to use on the rod..More specifically that the lower rating was to be used when using a weight forward line on the rod and the second rating was when using a double taper line on the rod..As Andre mentiond..The rods are nor really rated but rated for what size lines can be used.
    Last edited by core fly; 11-08-15 at 07:43 AM.

  3. #13
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    Im not sure how you could interpret anything I wrote as an indication of me thinking that dual rated rod is technically superior. Personally I don't like dual rated rods, but I do recognise that there is a need for them, when you consider what they are meant for. I prefer more specialised rods.
    Quote Originally Posted by ArcherFish View Post
    Are you then suggesting that a dual rated rod is therefore technically superior.
    I stand by my personal opinion.
    As a know-it-all you should know better, so you must be correct.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  4. #14
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    Jun 2012
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    Interesting subject, I've never had a satisfactory explanation of this. I've got a 10/11 GL3 Loomis which I love. It certainly would never throw a DT line! It's an old rod and over the years I have used both 10 and 11 weight lines on it. I prefer 11 weight lines on it nowadays( I've got SA GPX lines on it at the moment so I guess it's 11.5!). Have heard before that it refers to sinking/ floating line rating, with heavier rating for floating lines. In the end the only way to know what fits a rod is to throw it with various weights.

  5. #15
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    Hi tombosis,
    Interesting that you mentioned that the rating applies to sinking lines. This would explain why my 4/5wt's load much better with a 5 weight intermediate than a GPX 5 weight floating. I must say this is actually extremely irritating, as the cost of buying a fly line is a hit and miss affair. Also, not many fly shops offer the facility to cast with lines prior to purchase. Lines are not R400-500's anymore. To buy a Rio or Sixth sense these days will cost you nothing short of R1000. It's cheaper to buy rod that fits with a line than the other way round. At least you will be afforded the opportunity to cast with the rod and your line.



    Quote Originally Posted by tombosis View Post
    Interesting subject, I've never had a satisfactory explanation of this. I've got a 10/11 GL3 Loomis which I love. It certainly would never throw a DT line! It's an old rod and over the years I have used both 10 and 11 weight lines on it. I prefer 11 weight lines on it nowadays( I've got SA GPX lines on it at the moment so I guess it's 11.5!). Have heard before that it refers to sinking/ floating line rating, with heavier rating for floating lines. In the end the only way to know what fits a rod is to throw it with various weights.

  6. #16
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    Nov 2006
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    Western Cape
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    Heres a quote fro this site. http://www.sexyloops.com/articles/sexyrod.shtml

    The theory behind multiple line ratings is that with a double-taper line you can aerialise more line outside the tip and cause the rod to become 'soggy', and maybe even break. So the lower limit of the range should be used for a double taper, and the upper limit for a weight-forward line (remember twelve yards of a DT fly line has the same weight as ten yards of the next AFTM up).



    Quote Originally Posted by Fly-o-holic View Post
    Hi tombosis,
    Interesting that you mentioned that the rating applies to sinking lines. This would explain why my 4/5wt's load much better with a 5 weight intermediate than a GPX 5 weight floating. I must say this is actually extremely irritating, as the cost of buying a fly line is a hit and miss affair. Also, not many fly shops offer the facility to cast with lines prior to purchase. Lines are not R400-500's anymore. To buy a Rio or Sixth sense these days will cost you nothing short of R1000. It's cheaper to buy rod that fits with a line than the other way round. At least you will be afforded the opportunity to cast with the rod and your line.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Somerset West
    Posts
    85

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    Heres a quote fro this site. http://www.sexyloops.com/articles/sexyrod.shtml

    The theory behind multiple line ratings is that with a double-taper line you can aerialise more line outside the tip and cause the rod to become 'soggy', and maybe even break. So the lower limit of the range should be used for a double taper, and the upper limit for a weight-forward line (remember twelve yards of a DT fly line has the same weight as ten yards of the next AFTM up).
    That actually makes a lot of sense (I haven't used a DT line in over 25 yrs!), still a bit strange to put it on a 10/11 weight unless its a salmon thing? I seem to recall seeing 14/15 weight rated rods too!

  8. #18

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    Do you think this is still valid today?
    Not sure if anyone sells a DT line above 4wt, other than some specialist lines.

    Quote Originally Posted by core fly View Post
    The duel rating also had to do with showing buyers what line to use on the rod..More specifically that the lower rating was to be used when using a weight forward line on the rod and the second rating was when using a double taper line on the rod..As Andre mentiond..The rods are nor really rated but rated for what size lines can be used.
    Regards
    Craig

  9. #19
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    Nov 2006
    Location
    Western Cape
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    Actually makes sense, in that anything under 4wt and under is probably a specialised rod anyway. I have come across a 3/4 wt rod....but they are very few and far between., so why go for a WF line when a DT is better for specialist applications anyway. Its very difficult, if not impossible to operate specialist line control techniques and casting with a WF anyway. To me, WF lines have no advantage other than medium and far distance casting.
    Quote Originally Posted by ArcherFish View Post
    Do you think this is still valid today?
    Not sure if anyone sells a DT line above 4wt, other than some specialist lines.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

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