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Thread: Bead Heads

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by GGY View Post
    Metric v Imperial conversions are not very good starting point. A lot of the bead manufacturers make both metric (in 0.5mm increments) and imperial (in X/8 or 16 or 32 or 64) - some mix and match similar sizes.
    I personally prefer the 0.5mm metric increments for my beads.
    5/64" = 2.0mm (close enough)
    3/32" = actually 2.4mm
    7/64" = actually 2.8mm

    Since volume of a sphere is 4/3*Pi*r^3:
    A true 2.5mm has 13% more volume than a 2.4mm
    A true 3.0mm has 22% more volume than a 2.8mm

    Here are some figures (These I weighed myself):
    Type Size Mass (g)
    Tungsten-Slotted 4.0 0.432
    Tungsten-Slotted 3.5 0.287
    Tungsten-Slotted 3.0 0.190
    Tungsten-Slotted 2.5 0.124
    Tungsten-Slotted 2.0 0.053
    Tungsten-C/Sunk 3.8 0.421
    Tungsten-C/Sunk 3.3 0.281
    Tungsten-C/Sunk 3.0 0.195
    Tungsten-C/Sunk 2.5 0.116
    Tungsten-C/Sunk 2.0 0.065
    And material, as well as actual dia, hole/slot dia, countersunk cutout also make a big difference in overall mass.
    In the above, the 2.0mm slotted actually has less mass than the 2.0mm countersunk - this I think is due to central hole size.

    Weigh 10 beads to reduce error.
    If you are going to compare using a powder scale - 1 grain = 0.065grams & most measure to 1/10 of a grain = 0.0065grams
    Thanks Gary

    For interest sake were those measurements based on Competition Tungsten beads or another brand name?

    Would be interesting to compare the two brands if different.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grant111 View Post
    Thanks Gary

    For interest sake were those measurements based on Competition Tungsten beads or another brand name?

    Would be interesting to compare the two brands if different.
    The 3.8 & 3.3mm were bought in Czech, the other are from the same SA supplier, which is probably sourcing from a single Chinese supplier (but that cannot be confirmed).
    I did not add the Competition Tungsten results to the spreadsheet I had - I was comparing against a printout at the time.
    Gary
    Flytyer - Where great flytying begins

  3. #13
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    Gary
    I managed to get some beads that were not counter sunk.
    Did you ever weighed the "non counter sunk" beads? (just a flat, square back)
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    Gary
    I managed to get some beads that were not counter sunk.
    Did you ever weighed the "non counter sunk" beads? (just a flat, square back)
    Not that I can recall.
    Non-slotted beads can have many differences in their profile. Vast majority are countersunk, and the degree (literally) of the drillbit head doing the countersinking(?), as well as how much metal is removed from the spherical bead as a result, can make a large difference in final mass.
    Depending upon how much metal was removed when they made the bead back flat/square, will also affect final mass.
    LOTS of variables.
    Personally, I am moving to slotted beads wherever I want max sinkl rate, even on non-jig hooks. This is for the greater bead mass, which may allow for smaller beads to be used or better sink rates for the same overall volume of the fly.
    Gary
    Flytyer - Where great flytying begins

  5. #15
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    I am of the opinion that the biggest "weight reducer" is the counter sinking.
    On some of the beads, I add weight by wrapping lead wire into the counter sinking gap/cavity and then a drop or 2 of Super glue or Sally Hansen.
    If you add the lead wraps in the counter sink hole, there is a worthwhile amount of extra weight to your tungsten bead.
    Try it.
    I do not have a very delicate scale as you guys, but it will be interesting to see how much this adds to the "weight of the bead"
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GGY View Post
    Not that I can recall.
    Non-slotted beads can have many differences in their profile. Vast majority are countersunk, and the degree (literally) of the drillbit head doing the countersinking(?), as well as how much metal is removed from the spherical bead as a result, can make a large difference in final mass.
    Depending upon how much metal was removed when they made the bead back flat/square, will also affect final mass.
    LOTS of variables.
    Personally, I am moving to slotted beads wherever I want max sinkl rate, even on non-jig hooks. This is for the greater bead mass, which may allow for smaller beads to be used or better sink rates for the same overall volume of the fly.
    Ok Gary now you just lost me. Slotted beads weigh less than countersunk beads. So why use them other than for jig hooks.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    I am of the opinion that the biggest "weight reducer" is the counter sinking.
    On some of the beads, I add weight by wrapping lead wire into the counter sinking gap/cavity and then a drop or 2 of Super glue or Sally Hansen.
    If you add the lead wraps in the counter sink hole, there is a worthwhile amount of extra weight to your tungsten bead.
    Try it.
    I do not have a very delicate scale as you guys, but it will be interesting to see how much this adds to the "weight of the bead"
    Sorry - I should have said that I always fill the hole/gap with lead, and a couple of turns extra, where appropriate to go under the thorax.
    Quote Originally Posted by Grant111 View Post
    Ok Gary now you just lost me. Slotted beads weigh less than countersunk beads. So why use them other than for jig hooks.
    Nope - Slotted weighs more than countersunk (except my 2.0mm version).
    Gary
    Flytyer - Where great flytying begins

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by GGY View Post
    Sorry - I should have said that I always fill the hole/gap with lead, and a couple of turns extra, where appropriate to go under the thorax.

    Nope - Slotted weighs more than countersunk (except my 2.0mm version).
    Sorry I misread the previous part of the message, it makes sense now.

    Thanks

  9. Default

    I have started to press in a little Tungsten putty (Di-Do or similar) into the slot and applying CA over it. Works quite well for me.
    Last edited by smallstreams.co.za; 18-08-15 at 01:33 PM.
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

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