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Thread: Switch Rod

  1. #1
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    Default Switch Rod

    Ok, so now I have researched the entire Switch rod phenomina and are still of the opinion that the technique has application in SA.

    Thank you to all the 'flytalkers' for their assistance and comments.

    I have now decided to convert my 5wt and 7wt to switch rods, that would roughly translate into a 2 and 4wt switch rod.

    Francois and I have been having exchanging ideas (thank you for the lead Korrie) and I have a very good idea of the requirements.
    I have also joined all the spey and switch cast forums, and must say that the all over the globe I have received recommendations and advise.
    What is apparent is that although there are guidelines (very loose ones though), most spey and switch casters customise lines to rods.

    This is the next phase of the project and will start soon.

    This is specifically a question to the rod building guys/girls. How do I prevent the blank end from splitting now that I have extended the rod? Surely it cannot be as easy as wrapping the end of the blank where the next tapered part fits in?

    Your comments would be appreciated.
    Regards,
    Pierre

  2. #2
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    Default

    is it 2 parts of the same rod or is it sections from 2 different rods?
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  3. #3
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    Default

    Excellent, Im going to follow this with interest. I hope it works well for you.
    Im also very interested to find out from you where you feel that the technique has application SA and why you think so. would you care to expand on this please.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly-o-holic View Post
    Ok, so now I have researched the entire Switch rod phenomina and are still of the opinion that the technique has application in SA.

    Thank you to all the 'flytalkers' for their assistance and comments.

    I have now decided to convert my 5wt and 7wt to switch rods, that would roughly translate into a 2 and 4wt switch rod.

    Francois and I have been having exchanging ideas (thank you for the lead Korrie) and I have a very good idea of the requirements.
    I have also joined all the spey and switch cast forums, and must say that the all over the globe I have received recommendations and advise.
    What is apparent is that although there are guidelines (very loose ones though), most spey and switch casters customise lines to rods.

    This is the next phase of the project and will start soon.

    This is specifically a question to the rod building guys/girls. How do I prevent the blank end from splitting now that I have extended the rod? Surely it cannot be as easy as wrapping the end of the blank where the next tapered part fits in?

    Your comments would be appreciated.
    Regards,
    Pierre
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Andre
    I have seen how Francois uses his rod on the Orange for LM
    Very effecient for long casts, pick up of line, and shoot out.
    It is style that has a niche and it is a very enjoyable way to fish.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fly-o-holic View Post
    This is specifically a question to the rod building guys/girls. How do I prevent the blank end from splitting now that I have extended the rod? Surely it cannot be as easy as wrapping the end of the blank where the next tapered part fits in?
    Actually I think it is Just make sure your wrap is neat, tight and longer than usual. I reckon how tightly/well the pieces fit is what will do the damage (if they don't fit perfectly, that is).
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  6. #6
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    Default

    Moet asb net nie sÍ jy wil begin streamers swing vir LM in 'n tail out!!!!
    Gerrit Viljoen

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Beast Tamer View Post
    Moet asb net nie sÍ jy wil begin streamers swing vir LM in 'n tail out!!!!
    If all else fails, lower your standards.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  8. #8
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    Default

    If all else fails....chum!
    Gerrit Viljoen

  9. #9
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    Default

    Hi Korrie,
    Different rods. The extension piece fits inside the old blank.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Hi Andre,
    There are predominantly 3 areas where I believe this technique will add value. From a value adding point of view I’m referring specifically to distance and ease of casting. For ‘ease of casting’ I am considering fatigue and where a back cast is limited.
    Area 1 – Estuary fishing:
    I have had much success drifting crustacean and baitfish (especially estuarine round herring) patterns with the current. Especially from sand/mud banks into drop offs. The additional distance achieved with this technique will assist greatly to reach further banks and reduce fatigue.
    If you have done as much estuary fishing as I have, being able to reduce fatigue and consistently reaching further areas is an advantage as the water level is rising with the incoming tide.
    You will also be able to cover more water as the conditions change due to the incoming tide. Being able to reach a productive area as the water level rises and not needing to move continuously will be a great advantage. Especially in the EC estuaries where the electric rays are prevalent, it is beneficial to your health not to move continuously as the tide rises and step on these ‘*****’ fish. I have been shocked more than I care to admit and it is never pleasant.
    Area 2 – Vaal/Orange
    During my professional tenure in Gauteng, I was introduced to SMY fishing. Initially Czech nymphing was the order of the day. However, as winter approached and the water cleared, we had to fish at distance and in confined areas. He the ability to shoot line at acceptable distances with virtually no back cast is a major advantage.
    Also when you are fishing long lines and being able to mend at a distance will also ensure a natural drift due to the longer rod.
    Yes, you could use a fish duck or other craft to ensure that you reach productive areas, so can you with the longer rod. This technique will never replace the advantage of a craft and access to productive water, however it will afford you the opportunity to ‘cover’ more water from a single point.
    Area 3 - Stillwater trout
    Although many have commented that, due to the technique of spey casting, the line creates too much disturbance on the surface and has a negative effect on the fishing, I disagree. I do agree that when, the incorrect line (Skagit) and casting technique is used that ‘more than necessary’ surface disturbance is created. However, with the correct line selection (Scandinavian) and casting technique, minimal disturbance is evident as the casting anchor for Scandi casting is far less than for Skagit casting. Less ‘anchor’ translates into less surface disturbance.
    The many times that I have seen people foaming the surface with heavy flies while double hall casting AND still catching plenty of fish would suggest that still water trout are not as sensitive as we believe. My previous statement can obviously not be applied as a generic rule of thumb and is also not intended in that way. I do not wish to elicit a debate regarding trout sensitivity and their reaction to noise.
    So, I will endeavour to test this technique in the above scenarios and give feedback. As my time for fishing is very limited this may take several years.
    What I am sure of is that, before I provide my ‘ground breaking’ feedback and have all and sundry rushing to purchase a switch rod for a myriad of fly fishing applications, the more frequent fly fishers and professional guides will realise the advantages of this technique and promote long before I have supplied my ‘ground breaking’ conclusions.
    Hopefully, I will not be blissfully unaware of the technological advances made and also not be attempting to prove the validity and application of this technique in SA.

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