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Thread: Are carp really that blind????

  1. #1
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    Default Are carp really that blind????

    Hi Guys,Ive caught quite a few carp using Sean Mills pattern and sight fishing for them.However whilst trying for leeries using a 4o salty bugger i hooked this fish.I must be honest i didnt think it was a carp,but when it just hung with me and didnt start running,i was totally bemused.I have heard of guys getting them on clousers etc.Any theories out there or similar experiences.I have my own....will share them later.Dont have much time now.....
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    Stephen Smith

  2. #2
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    Null hypothesis: Being a Kaapie fish, it was trying to steal the fly, not eat it;
    Alternative hypothesis: Being a Natal fly, the Kaapie fish was giving it lip.

  3. #3
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    I find the most effective fly for carp is an undressed 14/0 treble hook - particularly effective for sight fishing.

  4. #4
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    My one and only carp ( on fly ) was caught whilst fishing for LM yellows in May on the Vaal. A 12.5 kg monster took a Redisgned Woley Bugger next to a hyancith bed.
    Does anybody know what the "code" is with river carp.
    It's not in the catching, it's in the learning something new.
    view albums at. http://www.flytalk.co.za/forum/album.php?u=659

  5. #5
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    My limited encounters with carp have been met with mixed successes, ranging from enfuriatingly frustrating to ridiculously easy fishing.

    On one occasion I arrived at the water to find carp basking in the shallows and all I did was dap my fly in front of their noses and like clockwork they would sip it in and I would be on. This particular outing yielded 5 fish in less than two hours.

    Another occasion I saw some surface activity in the corner of a dam but could not see the fish. The SE was pumping in my face and any attempt at a forward cast over the reeds into the corner was a complete stuff up, so I waded out to the edge of the reed verge to position myself about 5 metres from the corner and did a short diagonal blind cast into the corner, fishing the fly back along the edge of the reeds. This outing yielded 4 fish in the space of an hour.

    Following this success, I went back the next day and after two hours of doing exactly the same thing in windless conditions, I never got a touch. I then moved to the other side of the dam and cast out blindly into a bit of ripple on the surface and picked up a smaller fish, but that was it.

    A recent visit to Coastal Park with Kevin Cox turned out to be one of those frustrating days, where we could see plenty huge carp close to the surface, their huge garden-shovel tails breaking the surface here and there. This could have been sight fishing at its best, but the most accurate and delicate presentations, fly right on their noses kind of stuff, were flatly refused. I presumed that we were spooking them with our casting, so I decided to sit on the bank and dangle my fly in the water and wait for a carp to arrive. It wasn't long when one arrived, and I lifted the fly slightly to induce a take as the fish approached the exact spot, but the fish continued to grub on past with not so much as a look at the fly. I really could not understand it. More stealthy I could not have been. This outing yielded nothing, despite the fact that the carp were extremely plentiful.

    My only conclusion is that they can be extremely 'iffy'. Some days they will take a fly with loose abandon and then there will be days where they wouldnt give it a second glance. On these days, I doubt if one would be better off fishing with pap though. Perhaps a bare 14/0 treble hook dragged across their flanks, as KE suggests, is the way to go
    Last edited by Chris Shelton; 05-01-08 at 07:58 AM.
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  6. #6
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    Extremely 'iffy' is about right Chris!

    I agree - at times they'll take your subtly-lifted fly and at others they'll cruise around like aimless plastic-tit bimbos in Sugar-Daddy 4WD's futilely looking for parking spots at Sandton City.

  7. #7
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    Aah those coastal park scumbags. I've thrown slices of bread at them when they were like that and they even refused it. Normally they would at least scrape off the marge and use it to strain their meths.
    They get that big for a reason - they eat like kings.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by will101 View Post
    Aah those coastal park scumbags. I've thrown slices of bread at them when they were like that and they even refused it. Normally they would at least scrape off the marge and use it to strain their meths.
    They get that big for a reason - they eat like kings.
    I'd hate to know what they are dredging up from the bottom, it is one of those things I'd prefer not to know.

    Incidentally, I heard recently that carp see in infra red. Any truth to this rumour?
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  9. #9
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    Having chatted to Sean Mills (carp king deluxe) about the eyesight and my experiences.
    I have found that the carp is probaly the most spooky fish I have encountered. Sean asked me what time of the day it was.
    As with most fishing we think the best time is early morning and late afternoon.
    He confirmed from his experiences, that the carp see best when the sun is a bit lower, not midday.
    His best time to fish for carp is the brightest time of the day.
    Some how the sun very bright and high up, is not the best for the carp spotting people.
    I have tried it and have managed to get much closer to the carp in very bright sunlight and aroung midday.
    Try it and let me know, if your findings are the same.
    Korrie

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    Having chatted to Sean Mills (carp king deluxe) about the eyesight and my experiences.
    I have found that the carp is probaly the most spooky fish I have encountered. Sean asked me what time of the day it was.
    As with most fishing we think the best time is early morning and late afternoon.
    He confirmed from his experiences, that the carp see best when the sun is a bit lower, not midday.
    His best time to fish for carp is the brightest time of the day.
    Some how the sun very bright and high up, is not the best for the carp spotting people.
    I have tried it and have managed to get much closer to the carp in very bright sunlight and aroung midday.
    Try it and let me know, if your findings are the same.
    Korrie
    Very interesting observations these. My best experience was with the mid afternoon Summer sun on my back. I picked up 4 carp in close succession on that occassion.
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

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