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Thread: BELL PARK DAM in Drakensberg

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Default BELL PARK DAM in Drakensberg

    Hi,
    My wife booked a midweek break at Cayley Lodge in the Drakensberg for May 2009. I see the BELL PARK DAM in 500m from the lodge and fishing is permitted. It looks like a stunning dam!

    Has anyone fished there before? I see it is a big dam (90ha). The biggest dam I have fished for trout is 3ha, so what now. What tactics would you suggest?

    Cheers
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    KZN North Coast
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    You'll have a PM in a moment
    You are a perishable item. Live accordingly.

  3. #3
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    Nice looking piece of water. In my opinion the basics for fishing a bigger dam is pretty much the same. The fish will still be in the same places, it is just a bigger scale and you might have to search harder.

    Look for inlet streams, protected bays, weed beds, channels and so on.

    Try to find out from locals what works, look for signs of fish. Try to see what insect life is in the water and between the weed.

    Then get a fly into the water.
    PK

    I am haunted by waters - Norman Maclean

  4. #4
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    Thanks for sharing. Will be doing some reading how to approach this water

  5. #5
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    Float tube heaven
    everyone is a "guru" these days - re

  6. #6
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    Hopefully they have some boats for hire as well

  7. #7
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    May 2007
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    Parys, Free State
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    Def inlets and shallow water like PK suggests.

    Chuck some Damsels(let it have some orange in,imitate preggie scuds) and Dragon patterns and many variations of suggestive nymphs like buggers and so on.

    Then watch carefully to see fish chasing fry and dog forbit use an intermediate line in most cases.Fry swim parallel and not up(in normal conditions) and only when u know for sure that the fish r chasing them to the surface maybe then use a floating line.Zonkers or any baitfish imitation of prevailent species.

    Also fish the shallow bays when a particular hatch is coming off and try and match those on a floater.

    If u are allowed using a float tube determine the depth u are fishing at and use a flyline that can keep whatever you're trying to imitate at the feeding zone for as long as possible.

    Line
    Imitation
    Retrieve style

    Post pics

    G
    Last edited by Gerrit Viljoen; 16-01-09 at 05:31 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default

    I looked at the photos again.
    For bank fishing this is my suggestion
    There are fairly high banks with vegetation in most places.
    This might hamper your back casts.
    Fish diagonally into the dam, most of the time, if you cant get your casts out.
    It will help with the casting.
    If you have a wader, standing in the water might help as well.
    Most fish will be within a cast length from the side.
    A 2 fly setup will work very well.
    Start with a floating line and a 2,5 to 3 meter leader. Longer if you can handle a long leader with the casting. Flies about 60cm apart
    An attractor with another more natural fly.
    Let the point fly have a bit of weight. either lead wire or brass bead.
    After casting out, have different counts to get to various depths.
    If you are fishing from the side a stripping basket might be very handy, nothing as frustrating as the fly line continously getting stuck in the vegetation when casting.
    Cast out and retrieve after about 4 or 5 cast move a couple steps and repeat.
    Natural flies, dragons, damsels, little PTN, Hares ears, soft hackles even a buzzer or 2. Dwail bachs are also very handy.
    If the wind picks up, a slow sinking line or intermediate might be very handy.
    Just to get it sub surface.
    But a floating line being cast out and let the wind blow it, with the waves giving the flies a bobbing motion is also very effective.

    Attractors, Fritz, blob, minkies, in various colors.
    Orange have always been a good color as on attractor for me.

    If they have a boat, work the wead beds from the middle of the dam side.
    You wont get tangled as easily.
    The inlet/river bed is always a good place to fish as well.
    Enjoy and let us know how you did. Definitely envious of you.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  9. #9
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    hi guys,

    When ff large stillwaters, as Korrie mentioned orange, spot on. Most large waters have daphnia, micro flea type organisms that the trout feed on which is mainly mid water that are orangy/grey. Red Setter etc.

    Start ff the shallows and weedbeds early morning, then the drop-offs to deeper waters going real deep by midday with DI7 sinking with large flies. As the day starts to end, reverse these steps.

    Dave
    Handle every situation like a dog.- If you cant hump it, piss on it and walk away. --JASPER.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Gauteng
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    Thanks for the info.
    I have 4 months to tie some flies that might do the trick. I recently got a vice and some material as a present, so will be tying my first fly soon. I am still reading up on techniques...

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