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Thread: Howdy! Anyone an experienced Lesotho adventurer?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Cape Town
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    2

    Smile Howdy! Anyone an experienced Lesotho adventurer?

    Hi

    My name is Coenraad, I used to read the forum quite often but haven't had access to internet for a couple of months now.

    Anyways, I'm planing a rock climbing trip to Lesotho and I would hate myself if I don't get a line wet at least!

    I'm planing on going either in April or May and possibly again just after July (only if i can get a hold of some ice climbing gear)

    Now, I'd prefer to camp instead of living in a lodge, there is very little in the way of established climbing routes in Lesotho, so the location of base camp can be pendant on quality of fishing rater than climbing It would be ideal to camp somewhere close to large boulders, or boulder fields, to keep my non fishing friends occupied.

    Then, fly selection? still water (which dam is most productive) or streams? Also, do i need anything in the way of a permit or such?

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated in regards specifically to location of camping, productive spots and fly selection.

    Cheers

    Coenraad
    "The nomad is not necessarily someone who moves: there are travels in which one does not move, travels in intensity, ... nomads (are) those who start nomadizing in order to stay in the same place and free themselves from codes". - Gilles Deleuze

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,078

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    Most of the bigger rivers and streams will have fish in.
    Generally the higher up, the better. the furhter down stream, where most of the people live, lots of siltation, and probably caught out.

    Not sure which area you are going to, but worth taking a rod and some flies.

    Some nymphs, a couple of streamers and a couple of dry flies, should do the trick.

    There is basically only one dam Katse dam, have some decent trout, especially the tribs and inlets.
    Lesotho is a special place with some stunning fishing.

    Word of advice, ask the local chief for permission to fish, otherwise, you might be chased away, or have some of your goods disappear from the camping site.

    Remeber the land/river belongs to the local clan and the chief is in charge.

    Enjoy and give some feedback
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Western Cape
    Posts
    7,613

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    Yes, sound advice from Korrie. Unless you are going to fish in a resort controlled area, you absolutely must speak to the chief first, otherwise you will pick up trouble. That also goes for the climbing. Don't think you can just wander onto any mountain and climb it. Lesotho is very much run by tribal authority, so be aware that you are a guest in their country and will need to do things the way that they require. No permits neccessary, just the chiefs permission. Also dont go asking for permission empty handed, he is going to expect something in return.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Vandia Grove, Gauteng
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    Hi Coenraad,

    Carrying on from the other sound advice, if you don't know a bit already I heartily suggest learn a few Sesotho words of greeting and general chit-chat.
    It'll help break the ice and short-circuit things as well as raise a grin or two. I've got a Lesotho U-20 international joining my soccer club and I've found 'Sesotho Online' ('Sesotho.web.za') a simple - and free! - way to help my communications with him and to brush up on my Sesotho.

    I'm lucky to also be going to Lesotho over Easter with a couple of forumers.

    Hope you have a great and unique experience!

    cheers,
    Chris
    The more you know, the less you need (Aboriginal Australian proverb)

    Only dead fish swim with the stream (Malcolm Muggeridge)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Western Cape
    Posts
    7,613

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    http://www.tribes.co.uk/countries/le...genous/basotho
    here is an interesting, although very basic history of the Basotho people. If you are able to speak even a very small amount of the language it will always help. Whaever you do, don't try and speak Zulu to them. they hate the Zulus, as it was primarily the Zulus that caused the initial displacement of the Sesotho speking people of the Highveld and Natal in the early 19th centuary, and resettled them as refugees in the mountains, as a result of King Shaka's "difaquane", or "crushing the enemy" policies of Zulu expansion (the Zulus were quite nasty in those days)
    A very good read, is "Kings of the Zulus and their armies", by Johnathan Sutherland. It is an extremely well written book, and vital for every "old school" white South African like myself to read, to give a good picture on the historical influences that have a huge bering of the thinking of todays black people in our country.
    Enjoy lesotho, it is a remarkably beutifull place with a fascinating culture and history.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    2

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    Thanx for all the excellent advice! I have a rudimentary understanding of the sutho language (grew up in the eastern freestate) also, I am well acquainted with the african procedure of asking for permission from a chief and the necessary gift giving and respectfully lowered stance etc. To perhaps put some worries to rest; I have no intention of rampaging into the hills and rivers of the mighty mountain kingdom, and I would be sure to keep the rest of my party in check!

    If any of you come across a group of 4 shaggy looking guys in the wonderful mountainous playground that is Lesotho come around and say hi. We're not nearly as scary as we seem!

    Thank you all again for taking the time to comment and share some advice!! If any of you feel the urge to go climbing, drop me a line!!

    Cheers

    Coenraad
    "The nomad is not necessarily someone who moves: there are travels in which one does not move, travels in intensity, ... nomads (are) those who start nomadizing in order to stay in the same place and free themselves from codes". - Gilles Deleuze

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