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Thread: Wood grips - pro's and cons ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    Yeah look this wasn't a test to see what material is cheaper...just a plain test for myself to see what material I would prefer. Regardless of cost.
    Most guys in the USA it's not about cost either...they just love wood grips.

    Interesting about your cork...I'd be interested in getting some from you, if they are good.
    Those 700 rings I landed direct from Portugal are almost finished! I have enough left for about 4 grips, that's it. Trying to convince them to send me lesser quantities than 1000 at a time, but will see what they say.

    The "flor" rings from most companies like Mudhole, etc etc are flippen expensive and are CG2 or CG3 grade at best...not worth it.
    I'll post some pics tomorrow I hope. Alone with the kids till Thursday.

    I love the traditional look and feel of cork, so I'll also stick to it regardless.
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by smallstreams.co.za View Post
    I'll post some pics tomorrow I hope. Alone with the kids till Thursday.

    I love the traditional look and feel of cork, so I'll also stick to it regardless.
    Cool man, let me know...I'd be interested to take some from you. At R10 or so a pop, and if they are flor grade, definitely.

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    Cool man, let me know...I'd be interested to take some from you. At R10 or so a pop, and if they are flor grade, definitely.
    No probs - could even be less the more ordered. Will try take proper pics tonight and post tomorrow.
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    RodCraft - Centurion
    Posts
    162

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    Corrie , you have a very valid point about the WOW factor , this is maybe the single biggest reason guys get rods custom built for them , i have seen a few rods and cast a few with wooden grips , ja , they do look ok and so on ...BUT my biggest concern , way more than weight , slippery , or any thing else is ROD FLEX.

    No wooden grip flex as well or at all like cork. Imagine you take a wooden dowel stick and insert it into a metal tube , wiggle it around a bit and see the dents the tube made on the wood. This could be your fly rod blank with the stress marks on if wood was used.

    The same principle apply when building bamboo fly rods and seating the nickel silver ferrule ( guess it would be the same on fiber glass rods and metal ferrules). The metal ferrule is always split and flanged to set be able to " FLEX"

    Cork is KING

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,074

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    Ricko

    I agree with the flex.
    But for trout etc, how many times will the rod flex right into the handle?

    Big fish, especially salt, tigers etc, the rod will flex very far down.

    But there is something special to hold an exquisitly made rod, with a superbly turned wooden handle.
    No cork will ever have that feeling, for me at least.

    Do yourself a favour, build/turn a couple of wooden handles, finish it off.
    Then put that next to a cork handle.
    You will change your mind.

    With wooden you might sacrifice a bit of flex, but the end product will blow you away.

    Dont use an ordinary piece of beech, pine, etc.
    Get a stunning piece of wood.
    Most wooden traders will have a bargain bin.
    a wooden handle will cost probaly R30 to R50 for the off cuts.
    A wood turner will charge you R20 to 40 to turn a handle.
    If you have a standard shape, turning cost will come down to R5 a handle.

    Sanding, oiling finishing etc another R30 plus.
    SO a stunning wooden handle will be less than R100.00

    Plus you have a rod that is totally unique/custom.
    Not like a couple of 1000 other rods with a cork handle.

    PS: these are my observations and opinions, after exploring the wooden handles etc.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    But for trout etc, how many times will the rod flex right into the handle?
    It's about the give of the material, even when casting.

    Thanks Ricko, some good insight and input.
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,074

    Default

    With my #3 I have casted a full fly line a couple of times, but I have not felt the need for more give, but then again it is a 9" rod.
    Most trout rods are made for streams, were you dont cast more than half the line.
    So the longer rod has a bit more flex over the length, compared to a 6 7 or 8" rod. The biggest fish I have landed with the wooden grip is a 17 inch trout on the Cape streams, also did not need to have more flex in the grip.

    Mario
    All I can say is, make a wooden grip with some of the beautiful Wild Olive wooden, treat it and buff it up.
    Put it on the right blank, and then you might change your mind. But only might.
    Post a couple of pictures on Flytalk and lets see what the rest of the guys say.
    You might end up with lots of orders.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    Most trout rods are made for streams, were you dont cast more than half the line.
    The biggest sellers worldwide is by far 5wt and 6wt rods. By no means "stream" rods. As I mentioned on the first page, my one concern is the same as Ricko's, flex of the butt section where the grip is.
    I don't see any fly rod manufacturers putting wood grips on their fly rods, and there's a reason for it. Cork really IS king.
    (Unless you like the look of wood, don't mind the extra weight, don't mind the slight increase in slippery-ness, etc etc...then it's cool).

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    Mario
    All I can say is, make a wooden grip with some of the beautiful Wild Olive wooden, treat it and buff it up.
    Put it on the right blank, and then you might change your mind. But only might.
    Ito look I fully agree with you Korrie. Always have. The thing is, looks and function are 2 different things. If they can both come together and the look can fulfill it's function without any detriment to anything else (something Ricko has pointed out as a possibility), then by all means.

    A couple of years ago Mike N made a post about winding checks that are fitted flush that caused some rods to snap just above the check.

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    Post a couple of pictures on Flytalk and lets see what the rest of the guys say. You might end up with lots of orders.
    Will post if I ever do, but not because I am punting for orders.
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Skukuza
    Posts
    196

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    One thing not mentioned is the increased feel when youre fighting fish, and connectivity while presenting. I have a pine handle on a tenkara rod (http://www.tenkarausa.com/product_in...products_id/51), and I realise this is not a objective comparison to conventional tackle, but really do love it too. Does not slip when wet at all.

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