Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Okavango Trip -A few questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Johannesburg, Paulshof
    Posts
    305
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Okavango Trip -A few questions

    We are planning to fish the Okavango Panhandle in December I have two questions:

    Would you recommend taking malaria tablets or should we just take enough precautions to prevent to get bitten?

    What long sleeve quick dry shirt would you guys recommend, what are the options and price ranges? Already got a pair of Senqu pants for a very good price

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,038

    Default

    ALWAYS, BUT ALWAYS take Malaria tablets.
    If you do go get Malaria, the side effects of the tablets (if any) is far far less than Malaria.

    Do not believe any of the crap of "malaria tablets hides the symptons etc...."

    How many people got malaria that took no precaution compared to those that did take precaution?
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    4,268

    Default

    Last time we were up there we asked our host about taking malaria tablets. We have always gone up in Winter. He lives in Rundu and said that he does not think it is necessary to take the tablets in winter but would highly recommend taking them in summer.

    That's from a local, so i would say definately take the tablets. They are not lekker and make me feel edgy the whole trip, but as Korrie says, i would not take a chance, especially in summer.

    Speak to your doctor or pharmacist about them. My dad is a Pharmacist and his advice was the following:

    There are three options at different prices (about R50, R200, and R500) with the side effects being different for each as well as the course lengths.

    I have always used the middle option (Mefliam), but the course is 1 tablet a week for 6 weeks starting 1 week before you go and i felt k*k for all 6 weeks. Very hard to do for 4 weeks after your trip.

    My Dad does not recommend the R50 option and says the only advantage of the most expensive option is that it is a much shorter course but is a tablet per day, so you feel the side effects for a shorter amount of time.

    It is also very important to speak to a doctor or pharmacist because there are certain illnesses and medicines that you cannot take with certain types of malaria tablets. I remember him saying that the Mefliam cannot be used if you're pregnant, experience epilepsy, or have been taking medication for depression amoung other things that i can't remember, but they will be able to tell you.
    "So hereís my point. Donít go and get your ego all out of proportion because you can tie a fly and catch a fish thatís dumb enough to eat a car key.." - Louis Cahill - Gink and Gasoline

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Eastern Cape
    Posts
    6,347

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gkieser View Post
    Last time we were up there we asked our host about taking malaria tablets. We have always gone up in Winter. He lives in Rundu and said that he does not think it is necessary to take the tablets in winter but would highly recommend taking them in summer.

    That's from a local, so i would say definately take the tablets. They are not lekker and make me feel edgy the whole trip, but as Korrie says, i would not take a chance, especially in summer.

    Speak to your doctor or pharmacist about them. My dad is a Pharmacist and his advice was the following:

    There are three options at different prices (about R50, R200, and R500) with the side effects being different for each as well as the course lengths.

    I have always used the middle option (Mefliam), but the course is 1 tablet a week for 6 weeks starting 1 week before you go and i felt k*k for all 6 weeks. Very hard to do for 4 weeks after your trip.

    My Dad does not recommend the R50 option and says the only advantage of the most expensive option is that it is a much shorter course but is a tablet per day, so you feel the side effects for a shorter amount of time.

    It is also very important to speak to a doctor or pharmacist because there are certain illnesses and medicines that you cannot take with certain types of malaria tablets. I remember him saying that the Mefliam cannot be used if you're pregnant, experience epilepsy, or have been taking medication for depression amoung other things that i can't remember, but they will be able to tell you.
    Not much help here, maybe your dad was right, take the best and enjoy the rest. of the fishing. (money is comfort)
    Handle every situation like a dog.- If you cant hump it, piss on it and walk away. --JASPER.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Eastern Cape
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Defiantly take the tablets..lived in Mozambique for 3 years had malaria a few times. It’s not fun!!
    "Mefliam" for me was the worst it f@kked me up, everyone that I spoke to on site said the "Mefliam" was the worst. I have taken all the tablets from R50-R500 with the cheap ones being the best for me.. hope that helps
    Last edited by wok; 23-11-11 at 01:29 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Benoni, Gauteng
    Posts
    964

    Default

    Another thing to practice is to wear long sleeves and long pants during the evening and give yourself a liberal dose of tabbard as the sun goes down.
    If the pan handle recieves even half decent rains by december the amout of mossies in the delta is immense and prevention is half the battle won!

    They guys who say that Malaria tabs mask the symtoms are usually the guys who ignore the symptoms at early onset. When returning, If you even slightly suspect you have Malaria go to the doc ASAP.
    "All you need is ignorance and confidence and the success is sure." - Mark Twain

  7. #7

    Default

    I travel to malaria areas quite often and Malanol is the best option to prevent Malaria. It has no side effects and really works. I have no spleen, so I can't afford to get Malaria, so I have done my homework. The best thing to do is to avoid getting bitten, so long sleeves, Mosquito net and bug spray needs to go with. In the evenings and early mornings, the mosies is at their most active and will go after your ankles most of the time. Make sure you put enough tabart on your ankles and wrists. Enjoy the trip! If you don't want to take tablets, there is a home test that you can take with and two tablets that you need to take if you test possitive. This works quite well and all our managers in Africa use this method. The downside is you still get malaria (although it just feels like flu) and it comes back every now and then.

  8. #8

    Default

    I hope you will have room for your rods between all the pills and what not.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Johannesburg, Paulshof
    Posts
    305
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    Thank you for all the informative answer, I have also asked my brother in law that is a doctor and he suggested I take Doxycyclin. Has anyone used this tablet?

    Any suggestions on my second questions about the shirt?

    Any tips on flies and techniques you would suggest?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •