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Thread: Corumana dam December 2011/2012

  1. #1
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    Default Corumana dam December 2011/2012

    It was my usuall scouting trip for the year. My trip to Corumana Dam to see what the Tigerfish were up to. After an 8 hour wait at the border we eventually made it to Corumana dam and the camp. The dam was low and the weather not much on my side. Rain and muddy. After 2 days the weather cleared and we started our fishing. The dam being low, we knew fishing is going to be tough.

    Extremely hot on some days and cool on other days. Not a lot of natural areas for Tigers to ambush their pray. We started up in the mouth with no succes. We went to deeper water with the same results. Barbel was the only thing biting and the every now and then the odd Makriel. I changed over to a 5 weight fly rod and yellowfish flies. It was soon very clear that Mbiris can't resist the small flies and we caught them one after the other. Excellent bait for Tigerfish. The Tigerfish did not bite, we only caught Barbel (25kg, 18kg and more) At one stage I hooked a fairly sized Barbel on 5 weight flyrod. We changed strategy again, fishing after sunset on about the 4th day and the Tigers started showing themselves.









    My first Tigerfish was a fair size fish but we had a small window of time to fish. The dam is full of Hippos and hidden objects under water. On several ocasions we damaged some of our propellers when the dam level was higher. We could not stay for too long.
    W
    The next day early we tried to catch some more Mbiris. We drifted past a huge rock that is usually under water in the summer and I spotted a propeller. On closer inspection it was the lower shaft assembly of a 90-115hp yamaha or Mariner outboard. Somebody hit the rock when the dam was full, not knowing the hidden dangers of the Corumana Dam. The subassembly was broken of and sank to the bottom. Once more skippers, go slow in unknown waters.




    We caught a couple of fair size Tigerfish but the low level of the dam was not in our favour. I will go back in a month when the waterlevel is up and try again.








    Every now and then something else than a fish came out.

    Jaco v Deventer

  2. #2
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    Kewl report dude! Would love to see the yellowfish in that dam?

    The pic of the mussel on the tiger fly is very interesting. Did it attach itself to the hook while retrieving?

  3. #3
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    great fishing and report back. Well done!

    Just one question, why, when posing with for the photos do you stick your fingers into the gills of the tiger fish? Is there a particular reason?
    Frederick

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by FCLoretz View Post

    Just one question, why, when posing with for the photos do you stick your fingers into the gills of the tiger fish? Is there a particular reason?
    I missed that Ya, please handle with care. Tigers are very fragile, except their jaws.

  5. #5
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    The mussel attaches itself. This happens on a regular basis in the strong stream of the inlet of the dam.

    The Tigerfish has a nasty bite, the only way to handle it quick for release (1 minute max) is to stick your index finger just behind the gills and not touching the gills. This way a Tigerfish can not move and it is easy to take a picture and release it quick. In many years of Tigerfishing, I have never lost a Tigerfish by using this method. I put it back in the water and it is gone in an instant. We will at times use the same method to pick it up out of the water. I do not hang a Tigerfish on a line. It will shake itself loose and damage itself. The moment you get your index finger in the right spot it is basically parralized until you let go
    Jaco v Deventer

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corumana View Post
    The mussel attaches itself. This happens on a regular basis in the strong stream of the inlet of the dam.

    The Tigerfish has a nasty bite, the only way to handle it quick for release (1 minute max) is to stick your index finger just behind the gills and not touching the gills. This way a Tigerfish can not move and it is easy to take a picture and release it quick. In many years of Tigerfishing, I have never lost a Tigerfish by using this method. I put it back in the water and it is gone in an instant. We will at times use the same method to pick it up out of the water. I do not hang a Tigerfish on a line. It will shake itself loose and damage itself. The moment you get your index finger in the right spot it is basically parralized until you let go
    Interesting about the mussel, thanks. We are not being nasty about the fish being gill proded but maybe a springloaded lip grip would be a better choice for controlling the fishes head while supporting the body with your hands? Just a thought.

  7. #7
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    The gills in the fish is not touched at any time. Lip grip has broken of teeth before on a fish that I caught. I do not use them at all. My Tigerfish experiences started in the early 80's. We had a lodge in Zambia long before lip grips came out. The biggest threat to a Tigerfish is the time you keep it out of water. I've seen local produced programs on DSTV where people try to recooperate Tigers beause they were out of the water for too long.lip grips were used. This means even if you use lip grips you will kill the fish if you do not return it quick to the water. I have never lost one, neither had to keep him to make sure he survives. Release it quick is the rule. I understand the peoples concern, but believe me the Tigerfish is returned to the water in the same condition it was before I caught it.
    Jaco v Deventer

  8. #8
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    Getting back to the yellowfish. They are there but I have never tried. Downstream from the dam is the Sabie/Komati confluence. Lots of rapids from the damwall down to the confluence. I don't get the time to fish for them. One day I will.
    Jaco v Deventer

  9. #9
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    Hey Jaco,

    I understand and thanks for being conservative with tigers, I have been following your posts . It just looks nasty when you see fingers in the gills of fish, any fish. Its sad how little people care when catching fish and unfortunate for tiger because of that nasty bite, if not careful.

    Maybe a tail grab and body support would be the best then

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corumana View Post
    Getting back to the yellowfish. They are there but I have never tried. Downstream from the dam is the Sabie/Komati confluence. Lots of rapids from the damwall down to the confluence. I don't get the time to fish for them. One day I will.
    That will be nice to see. I know that area and have caught yellows there.

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