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Thread: Habits and characteristics of the fish you target

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by wernerm View Post
    I prefer peace Shammers, besides having much more fun reading the ff related stuff. Lot's of good info from back in 2008

    PS: You're not part of the click
    Monkey biets
    Bubble, Bubble, Bubble and Squeak...I think this mixture is too weak!!!???" (Wrex Tarr)

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shamwari View Post
    Monkey biets
    I have no idea what that means
    Fishing is just my thing. I don't know what it is but it seems that i just can't get enough of it.

  3. #13
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    I've been targeting the elusive silverfish for some time.
    Thanks to the efforts of some forumers I also managed to find some flies that not only immitate their food source but also hooks them in the mouth everytme!

    Lepisma saccharina, is also referred to as sharks by some, but dont let them fool you. Although some refer to them as sharks or more specifically as carpet sharks they are good fun and give as a good fight once caught. They are almost impossible to hold once caught, so photograpic effidence of flyrod hunters posing with a rod in the mouth (rimjob) and Lepisma saccharina in the hand is almost impossible to find.

    Silverfish moves almost like any other fish but it is their silvery light grey and blue colour that distinguishes them from any other fish.

    Catching Silverfish is damn hard as their diet almost solely consists of carbohydrates such as sugar or starches.

    One method of hooking these pedantic critters is to dress a number 38 fly in dental floss in stead of silk. It is said that the extra attraction or scent of the dental floss attracks silver fish more than Marmite, gulp or old socks.

    What sets targeting silverfish apart from any other specie common to the Vanderbijl area is that Silverfish are nocturnal and can only be targetted at night. The SA record however stands at 25 millimetres caught in day time in Herman Jooste's sock drawer!

    Lacking wings, like all the Apterygota species the said angler mistook the silverfish for a Parktown Prawn but even so, still had it weighed by Smit Street butchery's and claimed the All-African Record.

    On registering the record, interest has sparked in catching this elusive specie. Two silverfish masterclasses has allready started accepting bookings in targering its closest relatives namely: the North America, Ctenolepisma longicaudata and Ctenolepisma quadriseriata - the urban silverfish. As well as the Australian species, referred to as silverfish Acrotelsella devriesiana, although a different lepismatid.

    Even if unsuccesfull all participants attending the masterclass will receive a cap embroided by Joshua Doore. - Your uncle in the furniture business.
    Last edited by redhumpy; 29-01-12 at 04:18 PM.

  4. #14

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    Wonderful!

  5. #15
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    I have have also been doing some homework along the same lines, but on what is the currently available food source(s) and found some interesting stuff.
    Hopefully I have identified them correctly (especially the caddis larvae that were attached to a rock). There was also an abundance of bloodworm, but I thought that the midge pupae is quite interesting, since it came in one of my bottom dredged samples.
    I have also managed to make a video clip of the dragon nymph's "propultion" action and can provide that (with some help) if somebody is interested.

    Stephan Nortjé
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by markdej View Post
    Targeting goldfish in garden ponds is a guilty indulgence of mine

    Although much is said about their 3 second memory it has been proven that goldfish form complex social structures and display in group and out group behaviour, with dominant fish changing on a regular basis.

    As they are such social fish the best time to target them is when they are shoaling. Solitary fish who are roaming about on their own in search of food are more likely to inspect your offerings with a critical eye, but shoals tend to scrap over who gets their first.

    From an activity standpoint, although you can target them all ear round, they are far more lethargic in winter, preffering to eat detritus and such in deeper water (75cm + where possible) rather than actively forrage about in the shallows. With the prime times of year being the transition seasons, before it starts getting too hot in summer. (Though if your pond is well shaded you can target them confidently throughout summer)

    For the most part very few goldfish are "wild" in any sense of the word, so a reasonable pellet imitation is almost always your go-to fly. I find it poor sport to chum for them first, but this is ofcourse a possibility, so your best times would be when they expect to be fed. (As they are such social creatures they seem to adapt rather quickly to a feeding routine.) I have found that in smaller ponds where they dont exceed 15cm something in a #24 klinky in either green or red (dependinng on the pellet mix they get fed) works well, as it is small enough to fit in their mouths and quick to tie and frankly I cant spin deerhair well on a #24. You need to be fairly innovative though, as word of deception seems to spread quite quickly in a pond and you'll likely only be able to get 4 fish before needing to change your pattern, but the same basic idea with a few color variants is all thats needed.


    Lastly because they associate people with food (if fed regularly) they will not be even remotely spooky the first few times. Once the realisation that people = danger sets in, thats where stealth is required. Ive found that using the natural cover your garden provides and keeping low to your lawn/decking allows you to get in quite close, but then implement a hand cast rather than use a rod to cover the water. (Though the tip section of a rod does work)
    As they tend to flop around on the surface when hooked, the fight isnt really a concern and 8x tippet could even be considered overkill.

    Night fishing for them is a possibility if they are routinely fed at night, though a light above the pond is prefferable.

    So there we go! I wish you all luck with any future goldfish endevors!
    How about fillet instructions and a recipe???

  7. #17
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    Clanwilliam Redfin (Barbus calidus)

    I know very little about their feeding habits in winter, however in summer they are not very picky or spooky.

    I find one of the best methods is to stand in the water absolutely still until they come and nibble on your legs and then you drop a #18 nymph on their heads. It should be weighted with a 2mm orange tunsten bead. They will also take dry flies and a #10 para RAB is never left alone, however I usually reserve this method for trophy hunting. When fishing for trophies do not use anything under 3wt as you often pick up a yellow. Fishing in the Cederberg area makes it interesting as you also have the chance of picking up a fiery redfin (Pseudobarbus phlegethon) or the extremely rare twee river redfin (Barbus erubescens)

    They are a shoaling species found anywhere in the river however your best chance of catching them is in water of more than 40cm depth. If, at the same time, there is some palmiet and a slow current you have a good chance of a real trophy. If you don't get a take on your first two casts move on as this indicates the lack of a shoal in the area. When using nymphs your best chances of a hook up are if you are watching the nymph. The are incredibly quick and you (probably) won't pick up a take on an indicator.

    For the dry fly you might need to adjust your mindset a little if you are used to trout. You need to strike as you see the rise and sometimes even before. At this point it helps to be psychic so that you can anticipate the rise and start striking before it happens.

    These methods have also been succesful for the Breede River redfin (Pseudobarbus burchelli) and the Eastern Cape redfin (Pseudobarbus afer)

    Here is a photo of a real trophy I got in the holidays.

    IMG_4901.jpg
    Last edited by dtayl13; 29-01-12 at 11:58 AM.
    An honest fisherman is a pretty uninteresting person.

    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and not only is he hungry but broke for the rest of his life as well.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dtayl13 View Post
    Clanwilliam Redfin (Barbus calidus)
    IMG_4901.jpg
    Looks like great fun, a real opportunity to hone skills.
    Fishing is just my thing. I don't know what it is but it seems that i just can't get enough of it.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by dtayl13 View Post
    Clanwilliam Redfin (Barbus calidus)

    You need to strike as you see the rise and sometimes even before. At this point it helps to be psychic so that you can anticipate the rise and start striking before it happens.

    IMG_4901.jpg
    DON'T STRIKE! If you do, you'll get the proverbial "slap in the face with a wet fish". Just twitch your line with your line hand to set the hook. I've had more flying-fish in the Cederberg than on the Holsloot!

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