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Thread: Two rods on a float tube...

  1. #1

    Default Two rods on a float tube...

    I usually only take one rod out on my tube.I know some people take two out.
    How are these rods used in combination when fishing?

  2. #2
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    Well i set two rods up, one with a floater and the other with a sinking line, and the flies i will start with. Would set 3 up, but don't own that many rods (yet). There are velcro tabs on the side of the tube to which i fasten the rod not in use. Works a charm. Easy to swap as the situation changes.
    If you work with monkeys you'll definitely slip on a banana peel!
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  3. #3

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    Outriggers

    Depends on the particular fishery really. But generally I prefer to take just one rod - for simplicity.
    If not travelling far on the water, one can always return to the car to get the other rod if necessary.

    If I do decide to take two rods I'll put the sinking line on one, floating on the other - both rigged before launch. The second rod is always a bit awkward, so keep it with line threaded but dismantled and neatly strapped / secured with Velcro out of the way.

    EDIT: posted without reading Appin69's post above - sorry for the repetition.
    Last edited by William Ewels; 16-07-13 at 08:56 AM.
    The highest form of existence is play.

  4. #4

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    i also rig two rods for the tube. when i get to the water, i decide which flies/combination i am going to start with. both rods are fully rigged when i launch. i usually start fishing with the floater just because i prefer this method. as i cast over my right shoulder, the sinking set up is secured on the left hand side with the tip pointing backwards. i adjust it in the velcro so that the tip touches the water or is just under the surface (less chance of tangling with the other line).

    the other thing i do, and please dont jump on me about ethics etc, is i carry a small anchor (one i use on a fishing ski as well)
    on windy days, i will actually anchor, fish for a while, move to another spot, anchor, and so on.
    this works for me, as i dont still have to concentrate on not being blown off my spot.
    as i usually fish alone, i dont know if others do this. will be interesting to hear.

  5. #5
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    I find it easier to change lines than to have the PT of a second rod to worry about. A line change takes a minute, and with a leader already set up on the other reel, its easy. I have only tubed a few times, so perhaps dont have the experience yet to comment difinitively, but I cant treally see the point of two rods when changing lines is so easy
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    I find it easier to change lines than to have the PT of a second rod to worry about. A line change takes a minute, and with a leader already set up on the other reel, its easy. I have only tubed a few times, so perhaps dont have the experience yet to comment difinitively, but I cant treally see the point of two rods when changing lines is so easy
    I think if you fishing on a boat it definitely makes more sense to just change lines, plus you actually can't have a spare rod lying around when there are 2 guys on the boat.

    Thing with a tube is that it ain't as easy to change lines as space is limited, you end up having almost your entire rod submerged and it is just a matter of time before you lose a rod. The second rod is also out of the way. I find on a tube you move around a lot more(types of structure) and I swap lines regularly so for me it is easier to swap rods and not change lines. I also am a bit of a line snob, I have a rod dedicated to fishing my floating line, I don't like to fish an inter or sinking line on this rod
    The closer one gets to realizing his destiny, the more that destiny becomes his true reason for being! Paulo Coelho

  7. #7
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    Could be. I changed lines on the tubea few times without submerging the rod. Not sure why you would want to submerge it. I found it very easy. I Just disasemble the rod at the mid point, and then its easy. I also do this on a boat anyway.
    Each to his own. If its easier for someone to take a second rod, then good. I just find it easier to change lines. For me, the risk of a second rod in structure while on the tube, isnt worthwhile, when a line change is so quick.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    Could be. I changed lines on the tubea few times without submerging the rod. Not sure why you would want to submerge it. I found it very easy. I Just disasemble the rod at the mid point, and then its easy. I also do this on a boat anyway.
    Each to his own. If its easier for someone to take a second rod, then good. I just find it easier to change lines. For me, the risk of a second rod in structure while on the tube, isnt worthwhile, when a line change is so quick.
    Breaking rods, changing lines, change flies for me is more time consuming then just swapping a rod. There are also times when its windy, freezing cold etc that make this a bit more difficult to do.

    For the way I fish it is a lot easier to have two rigged rods, it's kinda a no brainer!
    The closer one gets to realizing his destiny, the more that destiny becomes his true reason for being! Paulo Coelho

  9. #9
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    Ya, it's each to his own. I guess i have learned to go with what I have always done. I havent ever really fished with a second rod rigged, and until Im comfortable trying it, I cant really say. Also, being quicker isn't really the objective, its more convenience. In my competition times, it was important to change quickly, and we practiced line changes quite a but, and most of the good guys could change a line and tie on three flies very quickly, so even though I was never the speediest line changer, it is still more comfortable for me to change lines rather than have a spare rod on the tube that can get in the way .....its just me, I dont begrudge the guys who prefer to have a second rod. I would probably try it sometime. I also remember that i used to prefer fishing from a boat, until I tried the tube, now I see definate advantages to both, so maybe there are also advantages to having a second rod rigged up as well.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  10. #10
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    Two rods, one sinking, one floating. Quick and easy to switch - velcro tabs or carabiner are easy to use.

    Seen a friend lose a spool off a tube while changing lines - also the chance of losing a rod section, etc over board.

    I'd suggest that you save yourself the hassle and use two.

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