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Thread: Winter Garrick

  1. #11
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    All response has been welcome as it means they are here pretty much year round.

    Here is the link for the SBS on the fly I've been using. It is very easy, give it a try

    http://www.flytalk.co.za/forum/showt...661#post238661
    " Not tonight baby! I gotta fly"

  2. #12
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    Thanks for Posting the SBS. It is much appreciated.
    A man is only as big as the things that annoy him.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Botes View Post
    Not entirely correct. Yes, the majority migrates to KZN but a fair amount of adults remain in the estuaries of the western, southern and especially the Eastern Cape. I know of anglers who have consistently been catching leeries over 10kg's in estuaries throughout the entire winter.
    That is quite interresting, thanks for the info. In the EC you would run into tons of the same sized leeries ... up to a certain point (fishing depth wise) that you would start hitting the Kablejoue 3kgs to 6kgs were common in the same water as the Leeries, never ran into a bigger Leerie however except for in spring/summer with the daily tidal movement.
    "Hierdie drol het baie vlieŽ" - Ago 2014.

  4. #14
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    A lot has to do with certain estuaries, some can be more healthy then others. Also the water temperatures helps a lot weather the larger ones stay or leave, something I heard on a program some time ago about fish populations in certain estuaries.
    The Knysna Estuary must be getting healthier as this year it produced the best Garrick fishing in years.
    " Not tonight baby! I gotta fly"

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by briansflyfishing View Post
    A lot has to do with certain estuaries, some can be more healthy then others. Also the water temperatures helps a lot weather the larger ones stay or leave, something I heard on a program some time ago about fish populations in certain estuaries.
    The Knysna Estuary must be getting healthier as this year it produced the best Garrick fishing in years.
    Don't be fooled, the ecoli counts are still high, the silting is worse than ever and the upper pink prawn banks are almost entirely gone. The changes we've witnessed in the past 15 years are quite simply very sad.

    There have been good leeries catches every year, some better than others. Unfortunately this isn't an indicator to an improved estuary.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by fdavis View Post
    ... Unfortunately this isn't an indicator to an improved estuary.

    And good luck with trying to get those ecoli counts to go down, it's only getting worse, everywhere ... and with that comes disease, increased fish mortality and well honestly ... who wants to fish or wade in a toilet ?
    "Hierdie drol het baie vlieŽ" - Ago 2014.

  7. #17
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    Thanks Fred. I know that we had that sewege spill a while ago, but you know how the powers to be can lie to cover their asses.

    But your are right about the silting. But in general one likes to believe what we hear especially when it means your local waters are improving.

    But all Garrick fisherman, be it bait or lure or fly(of which I seem to be the only local), they all say that they had very good catches, with large specimens coming out that exceeds previous years.
    I like to remember the good and forget the bull.
    Lets hope that it does get better.
    " Not tonight baby! I gotta fly"

  8. #18
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    Hey Brian

    Sorry, this reply is late. I believe that the improved catches over the last few seasons has more to do with our improved ability to catch them, rather than an improved estuary. My grandfather used to tell us about how frustrated he would get about the amount of juvenile leeries he would catch on prawn while fishing for grunter, and also about how they considered the steenies a pest because they caught more than the spotties ( they wanted the spotties to eat).

    I haven't heard about juvie leeries eating guys prawns and we know how scarce the steenies are these days. We can't just use the Leerie stats alone as an indicator.

    We still have great catches - I've just had a bumper winter season - and I have it on good account that the ecoli count is down but the lagoon is not healthy. I've been using it since I was 7 and have seen the negative changes.

    It's up to us - the locals and regulars - to put time in and try make a difference. Even if its just picking up the litter we see along the shore, every little bit counts!

  9. #19
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    Well said Fred.
    Thanks
    " Not tonight baby! I gotta fly"

  10. #20
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    Good stuff guys. Interestingly, this winter the leerie have been quite prolific up my way (Port Elizabeth - Swartkops river and the surf zones towards Gamtoos). The surf zones are still producing good sized fish deep into winter and the river is full of juveniles, with the odd bigger fish showing up. Those who are familiar with the P.E area, will know there is a small blind river, the Van Stadens River, about 30km west of P.E. Last week I witnessed with my own eyes, a chap catch a leerie of atleast 8 kilograms in a thrownet whilst netting mullet. The river has been closed for quite some time. So that fish was cruising around that tiny blind river, no deeper than your knee in most parts, for months. Leerie are amazing fish!

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