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Thread: What weight for light salt water use

  1. #1
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    Default What weight for light salt water use

    Just a quick question,
    What weight would one recommend for light salt water use on our coastline.
    Is a 9wt not an overkill? Would a 7wt not work?
    Just that I'm looking at purchasing a new rod, but don't want to have overkill and on the other hand, don't want to go to a gun fight with a knife.

  2. #2
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    9wt.
    Your average river/dam holds maybe 1-5 different species you can catch, of which you know the rough sizes of most. Even then you sometimes get taken to the cleaners.
    The sea - that is another story.
    Gary
    Flytyer - Where great flytying begins

  3. #3
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    I believe the rod is less imporant compared to the reel in the salt. Though I would say a 9wt is the best all round salt rod not just for the fish that you may encounter but also for casting. Casting into a 40kmph wind is not going to be easy with a 7wt...
    Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience - "Ralph Waldo Emerson"
    www.flyordie.co.za

  4. #4
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    I think that the rod and reel are equally important, in some cases, the rod more so. There are many determining factors that would influence your choice of rod weight, and the size of the target fish might not be the most important. At the sea, the wind seldom doesn't blow, and sometimes, its in your face, so you need a rod with some muscle to be able to make the long casts that are almost always needed for salt water work. The size of the fly also is a determining factor. A heavier rod is going to be able to cast larger flies easier that a lighter rod. For me, I choose a 9wt, as it is easier to cast for hours on end, than having to force large flies through the air with a lighter rod. Except when targeting grunter in shallow estuaries, where I would probably go with a 7wt, where presentation is important.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ko7Ad View Post
    I believe the rod is less imporant compared to the reel in the salt. Though I would say a 9wt is the best all round salt rod not just for the fish that you may encounter but also for casting. Casting into a 40kmph wind is not going to be easy with a 7wt...
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  5. #5
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    Good advice above.

    I fished a 5/6 weight in the salt for the past few weeks and casting big poppers and clouser's is just painful, but fish under 2kg are more fun on a 6 than a 9.

    Make sure you get a "salt water" reel, large arbor with lots of backing, and make sure you rinse your kit after use.

    Ive found different lines make a huge difference for casting and a new line is always nicer to cast then an old line that's perished, so maybe look for a line that suited for salt as well. i prefer the WF lines.
    I have a 9 and the 6, and i definitely get more distance on the 9. Casting in the wind isn't always bad - maybe worse for accuracy, but on the other hand if it's a side wind you can use it to get even more distance.

    i'm no expert just my 2 cents

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    I think that the rod and reel are equally important, in some cases, the rod more so.
    Andre I agree with your advise. But please elaborate on the above statement?

    I cant see where in the salt a rod would be more important unless you are just casting flies without a hook point, no intention of hooking a fish To me the rod is just for casting in the salt, the reel should be capable of doing the fighting for you and that's why a reel with a reliable drag is more important in my opinion. I may however be missing your point or freshwater flyfishing was brought into the discussion?
    Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience - "Ralph Waldo Emerson"
    www.flyordie.co.za

  7. #7
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    Ok, it all depends on the target species and their size. Not all saltwater species will burst off in startling runs, so the reel therefore wont need to be so critical. for example, Leervis generally make one dash, and when they are close, very seldom will take off again, and even moderately sized leeries are quite easily subdues by hand on line, particularly with stripping gloves. Grunter also, don't tend to run a mile, but when targeting them, presentation is quite important, so rod selection is more important than the reel. I don't remember bringing freshwater flyfishing into it...I was talking salt water.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ko7Ad View Post
    Andre I agree with your advise. But please elaborate on the above statement?

    I cant see where in the salt a rod would be more important unless you are just casting flies without a hook point, no intention of hooking a fish To me the rod is just for casting in the salt, the reel should be capable of doing the fighting for you and that's why a reel with a reliable drag is more important in my opinion. I may however be missing your point or freshwater flyfishing was brought into the discussion?
    Last edited by Andre; 07-01-14 at 01:14 PM.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the advice.
    Have bought the new Xplorer Guide lll reel, awesome piece of work :-)
    Any thoughts on the Magnum 9wt?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craigis View Post
    Thanks for the advice.
    Have bought the new Xplorer Guide lll reel, awesome piece of work :-)
    Any thoughts on the Magnum 9wt?
    @Craig, Can you open up the drag on that Guide 3? Just for intrest sake. I know the Guide 2 couldn't and once you have sand in the drag its a mission to get it out if ever. I cant add anything about the Stealth. But be warned about Xplorer rods (slipping and breaking ferrules), lifetime warranties help nothing if you are forced back home from the water because of equipment failure.

    @Andre, I see your point. thanks for the clarification. I have unfortunatly not been in a salt senario where accuracy was of importance, but fighting fish by hand only a lot of times! But I have also been into big fish with crappy reels where if I had just listened to all the advice (buy the best reel you can afford) available at the time I may have landed a few fish of a lifetime.
    Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience - "Ralph Waldo Emerson"
    www.flyordie.co.za

  10. #10
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    I do alot of saltwater fishing, and i use an 8/9wt Airflo Bluetooth rod, with a Stealth Mid-Arbour 7/9wt reel. It works well, and i have taken this setup overseas, and had equal success. A good friend of mine, David Taylor, uses a 7wt, and prefers it to his 9wt. He has landed Garrick over 80cm on it, so dont drop the idea of using lighter tackle.
    Personally, i think a 9wt is slightly overkill for South African conditions. If you were to go for any weight, i would choose an 8wt, not too light, and not too heavy, just right.
    Also, when geting a new saltwater setup, make sure you pair it with a line that works! The Airflo Cold Salt is an animal in wind, which is often the case on our coastline.

    Just my 2 cents,

    Nick van Rensburg
    Catch and Release fishing is a lot like golf. You don't have to eat the ball to have a good time...

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