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Thread: Micro Dries

  1. #21
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    Jan 2007
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    Cape Town
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    Not sure how many times I will fish them, but it is something I set out to do, have a range of micro flies #20 to #30, Dries, nymphs and a couple of emergers.
    While I was visiting France a month or so back, they showed me an emerger pattern, The fish will not eat the nymph or the dry, only the emerger pattern.
    If this hatch happens, if you do not have the emerger, NO FISH.
    it was amazing #26, and that the fish will be so specific.
    So, it became a bit of a challenge to have a specific box with micros. for the just in case days.

    As for busting off, I have started to fish 8x more and more, and hardly snap off.
    A lot has to do with the knots, 8x diamter is 0.076mm and will have a breaking strain of 0.70 kg or 700grams or 1.5 pounds to about 900grams, depending on the brand.
    That is a big trout, and in water it "weighs" less. It is a matter of "praktoesh" with the thin tippets. a. the knots and b. how to "fish and fight the fish" with the thin diameter tippets.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  2. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    Not sure how many times I will fish them, but it is something I set out to do, have a range of micro flies #20 to #30, Dries, nymphs and a couple of emergers.
    While I was visiting France a month or so back, they showed me an emerger pattern, The fish will not eat the nymph or the dry, only the emerger pattern.
    If this hatch happens, if you do not have the emerger, NO FISH.
    it was amazing #26, and that the fish will be so specific.
    So, it became a bit of a challenge to have a specific box with micros. for the just in case days.

    As for busting off, I have started to fish 8x more and more, and hardly snap off.
    A lot has to do with the knots, 8x diamter is 0.076mm and will have a breaking strain of 0.70 kg or 700grams or 1.5 pounds to about 900grams, depending on the brand.
    That is a big trout, and in water it "weighs" less. It is a matter of "praktoesh" with the thin tippets. a. the knots and b. how to "fish and fight the fish" with the thin diameter tippets.
    Wrt emergers. I now rarely fish full on dry flies. Emergers make so much more sense, and you can fish the, in larger sizes too.
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  3. #23
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    Jan 2007
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    Cape Town
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    The more I "know" the more I realise, our fish are not really fussy, or "educated" compared to European trout or American trout.
    The flies they tie are more specific to a hatch and more an exact imitation to the natural than our "generic" patterns.
    I recall when one of the Czechs stayed with me for a couple of months.
    He took photos of the nymphs etc we found on the Elands and Hosloot.
    He enlarged the photos on his laptop and tied "exact" imitations in terms of color size etc. to the flies.
    He had the universal generic patterns, but that was not good enough for him.
    The same applies to the French. They have boxes of generic/universal flies, but they want exact copies as well.
    I am in that "phase" of tying right now.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  4. #24
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    Nov 2006
    Location
    Western Cape
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    The thing with the Cape strerams trout, and their "level of education", has everything to do with the rivers food source. With nutrient value being so low in our rivers, it created a food chain more dependent on sunlight and detritus. It means that there is a far greater variety of insects, so the fish seldom home in on one thing. If our rivers were more nutrient rich like the European rivers, we would have specific hatches of insects, due to low diversity, but higher numbers of a single insect, therefore causing the fish to be tuned into one food source. In short, our trout have to take what they can get.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  5. #25
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    Nov 2006
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    Western Cape
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    We can see it with the Holsloot, Korrie. Slightly more nutrient value in the water, due to the river being being fed from the bottom of the dam, causing slightly more specific insect hatches, and therefore, slightly more choosy fish.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  6. #26
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    Oct 2006
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    Blouberg
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    That was my experience. Not sure why this happened. Not every fish was deep hooked but it certainly appeared to me that a higher percentage were hooked in this manner with micro flies.

    I seldom fish below 18 (or above 14 for that matter), these days.

    I fish in the WC streams where the water is bouncy (not still).

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Blouberg
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    Korrie

    You're so right. Our rainbows are opportunistic (most of the time anyway).

    Go fish the Henry's Fork of the Snake and see what real selectivity is about. Trout with PHD's.

    4 or 5 simultaneous hatches and they lock onto one and then a stage of that hatch you must match (and I mean match).

    They are leader shy so you fish fry fly with a drag free downstream drift. They will not move out of their way to intercept your fly, so casting and controlling drift with pinpoint accuracy is the modus operandi.

    Get home, Tie on a black CDC and Elk in size 16 and fish happily the whole day. Beginner stuff compared to the Henry's.

    Quote Originally Posted by Korrie View Post
    The more I "know" the more I realise, our fish are not really fussy, or "educated" compared to European trout or American trout.
    The flies they tie are more specific to a hatch and more an exact imitation to the natural than our "generic" patterns.
    I recall when one of the Czechs stayed with me for a couple of months.
    He took photos of the nymphs etc we found on the Elands and Hosloot.
    He enlarged the photos on his laptop and tied "exact" imitations in terms of color size etc. to the flies.
    He had the universal generic patterns, but that was not good enough for him.
    The same applies to the French. They have boxes of generic/universal flies, but they want exact copies as well.
    I am in that "phase" of tying right now.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,038

    Default

    Neil.
    I have been thinking about this a lot for the last year or 3.
    after one of the Nymphing Masterclasses, I took one of the participants out on the river for a morning session.
    It was one of those Red Letter days, We did not move more than 10 feet or 10 river step/shuffles, without having a fish on.
    By 11, I stopped fishing as I had a lunch to attend.
    But my lingering thought has always been, "WOW, I cannot believe there are so many fish in the river."
    I have not had such a day again, maybe it is because we do not present "the right flies"?
    If we present the "right flies" or match the hatch, we might catch a lot more fish.
    in General, on the Cape Streams, we are happy to catch 20 or 30 fish a day
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

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