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Thread: Strange question

  1. #1
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    Default Strange question

    Hi All
    This may seem like an odd question but I will explain in due course.

    Does Haemoglobin fluoresce in UV light?
    An honest fisherman is a pretty uninteresting person.

    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and not only is he hungry but broke for the rest of his life as well.

  2. #2
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    I'd be interested to know the answer too my immediate guess is yes.
    Gerrit Viljoen

  3. #3
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    No. Haemoglobin absorbs UV light. Whether you can see it or not when shining a UV light on it depends on the surface the Haemoglobin is on. If that surface "fluoresce" you would see the Haemoglobin and not the other way around.
    Regards
    Dexter

  4. #4

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    Hi David. I would assume that it wouldn't...I could be 100% incorrect, but I suspect that it would appear black in uv light. (hold on whilst I go cut my hand in the cupboard with my uv gel hardener light..hahaha)

    More importantly tho, why are you asking? It is indeed an odd question, interesting...but odd.

    Matt.
    A man who lies to his own fishing diary is capable of anything and I usually like to think I have some limits.

  5. #5
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    Red light is the first colour to disappear in water of the visible spectrum. I think it starts to noticeable disappear at around 3 - 5m. The depth at which it disappears depends on water colour turbidity etc. I heard a story from I think Korrie about some place possibly in Canada in whatever conditions (cannot remember any details) where people catch fish on red buzzers only and at 15m+. There should be no reason for this. In theory a black buzzer should look exactly the same as a red buzzer at those kinds of depths.

    UV light penetrates water far further than any visible light. This means that a flourescent red material will appear to glow red at depth. If haemoglobin was fluorescent it would cause bloodworms at those depths to glow red. This would be the only way that trout could selectively feed on red organisms so deep.

    This is then also relevant to tying buzzers as a fluorescent material would need to be used when tying red buzzers or they would not be imitating the natural worm as soon as you tried to fish it deeper than 3m.
    An honest fisherman is a pretty uninteresting person.

    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and not only is he hungry but broke for the rest of his life as well.

  6. #6
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    As soon as I get my UV torch I will find some bloodworms and see if they fluoresce. I am assuming (hopefully correctly) that what causes chironomids to go red is haemoglobin.
    An honest fisherman is a pretty uninteresting person.

    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and not only is he hungry but broke for the rest of his life as well.

  7. #7
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    It won't help cause humans can't see UV with the naked eye you're gonna have to use a camera with UV capabilities.
    Gerrit Viljoen

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Largie Whisperer View Post
    It won't help cause humans can't see UV with the naked eye you're gonna have to use a camera with UV capabilities.
    UV reflection and fluorescence are two different things. UV reflection is simply when an object reflects rather than absorbs UV light. Fluorescence is when an object absorbs UV light and emits electromagnetic radiation of another frequency. Take a UV torch and shine it into your fly box in a dark room and you will see what I mean.
    An honest fisherman is a pretty uninteresting person.

    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and not only is he hungry but broke for the rest of his life as well.

  9. #9
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    correct. I have a uv torch, and you would be amazed at how many insects and creepy crawlies glow when you shine it on to them. scorpions, spiders, many catterpillars etc... quite fun when going camping. The main reason why I got it, was to search for scorpions in the tent after having a close call once.
    Quote Originally Posted by dtayl13 View Post
    UV reflection and fluorescence are two different things. UV reflection is simply when an object reflects rather than absorbs UV light. Fluorescence is when an object absorbs UV light and emits electromagnetic radiation of another frequency. Take a UV torch and shine it into your fly box in a dark room and you will see what I mean.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    correct. I have a uv torch, and you would be amazed at how many insects and creepy crawlies glow when you shine it on to them. scorpions, spiders, many catterpillars etc... quite fun when going camping. The main reason why I got it, was to search for scorpions in the tent after having a close call once.
    And essential when trying to avoid a thick tailed scorpion zapping you a shot...
    Bubble, Bubble, Bubble and Squeak...I think this mixture is too weak!!!???" (Wrex Tarr)

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