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Thread: Shilton SL6

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    William thanks so much for that post. Really helps a lot. Will keep you guys updated as well!

    Sent from my GT-I9500 using Tapatalk

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    I think it is a bit heavy...

    I have mine matched with a Guide 3 which comes in, with DI7 line and 150m of 30lb Dacron, at around 210grams and it is a really really really sweet setup, hard to believe it is an 8WT, the BVK's are really light.

    I also had it matched with an Ultegra 7/8 which with DI5 line and 150m of 30lb Dacron comes in at ~235grams, and the ~30grams difference does make for a noticeably different feel.

    If you look at the TFO BVK reel which is rated for the 8WT, it comes in at around ~5.02 ounces (~141grams) so add line and backing it should still come in at close to 200grams.

    Supposedly the SL6 comes in at ~230grams sans line or backing, while I don't think it will mess up your balance I do think it will make it a little butt heavy.
    "Hierdie drol het baie vlieŽ" - Ago 2014.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Western Cape
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    7,613

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    If there is not much line out the rod tip, how then would uplining help? How much line out the tip are you talking about?
    Quote Originally Posted by William Ewels View Post
    I'll put my SL6 onto a BVK 8wt later today and give you some feedback. I suspect it will be fishable but a bit on the heavy side. Salmon fishing (if it's anything like Alaska) is close quarters repetitive casting - so you tend not to have much line out the rod tip to balance things out and load easily - unless you upline.

    Largie said his SL6 was on a "TCX 7wt 10' " i.e. a longer and relatively stiff rod so a heavier reel would balance it okay.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    If there is not much line out the rod tip, how then would uplining help? How much line out the tip are you talking about?
    Andre, I'm not generally in favour of uplining for close work, rods designed for close work shouldn't require it. But here we are talking about 7 and 8wt outfits at home in the salt and generally optimised for distance with rated line. It's much the same reason some people love front end heavy redfish style lines in some locations for bonefish - where they get lots of closer targets.

    Have you done the salmon thing in Northern America?

    In various places where I fished for salmon over three weeks in Alaska the amount of line out the tip varied greatly from spot to spot. But really long shots were almost never needed because mostly they are migrating up the slow water and current eddies along the edge, keeping out of the deeper fast water. Or holding in the mouths of small creeks entering bigger rivers, or in holes up those little creeks. Consequently, sometimes there's no fly line out, maybe a meter, and you're basically just using the weight of the split shot to flip the fly out. In situations like that you could dispense with a fly line altogether - I did actually see people doing that standing in one spot for the whole day in the combat zones - many people also dispensed with a fly rod - just flipping their flies on bass rods.

    My friends and I preferred to walk away from the crowds in those "combat zones" where people fish almost under the rod tip, taking our chances with bears to get to more difficult spots and dealing with overgrown and tricky fly casting situations along the way - ranging from two or three rod lengths of fly line out, to maybe 10 meters. So hardly ever aerialising the whole head of the fly line. A heavier line definitely helped. And don't forget most of the time you are dealing with split shot and a fairly big fly, or a heavily weighted fly. So whenever there was part of the head in the rod tip it was easier to make loops that would carry the rig with a tad more stability and accuracy. It also helped the odd single handed spey cast in tight spots

    Hope that answers your question
    The highest form of existence is play.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Western Cape
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    Oh right, ok, no I haven't done any salmon fishing anywhere ever. I hear you about 2 or three rod lengths of fly line out. Yes that in upline would load a rod. I was thinking more towards a few inches to half a meter of fly line out the tip as being a " small amount of line out". But in your case, yes I agree.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Gauteng
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    11

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    Hi Karoo,

    the SL6 will be fine on the 8wt rod, you will have quite some backing, another option, which we often do, and it works a treat for those situations where you do not need too much backing, is to use the SLL6 spool. the SLL6 spool fits the standard SL6 reel perfectly, and so with the SL6 reel and a SLL6 spool you would effectively have a reel for your 8wt and the perfect reel for a 9wt.

    let me know if you require any further info.

    regards,

    Chad. info@shiltonreels.com

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Mpumalanga
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    156

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    Hi urbanchad.

    I thought that the SSL6 spool is bigger (has more backing capacity) than the standard SL6?

    Sent from my GT-I9500 using Tapatalk

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