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Thread: Position of float tube

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Johannesburg, Gauteng
    Posts
    20

    Default Position of float tube

    Hi Guys

    Sorry, last thread from my side, I posted about the float tube last week. Heading off on Wednesday for 5 days near Notties, will report back, hopefully with a video too...

    As I have never fished off a float tube before, I wanted to ask about positioning the float tube in a lake. I realise all lakes are totally different but hoping for some guide as a general rule... The spot we're going to has no weeds or structure as far as I know, is fairly large and I don't have an anchor (currently) to understand the depth (maybe something to get to find a certain depth?)... Is it best to position yourself 10m off the banks and fish along the banks where the depth drops or go into the middle of the dam and hope for the best? Obviously rises will give some indication of the position of fish but any other tips to help will be hugely appreciated. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    4,268

    Default

    Hi Dean,

    Closer to the banks is where i would start, fishing along them. The sun penetrates to the bottom closer to the edges of a dam so it is more likely for more life to exist there, and if there is more life there, the fish will more likely be there to eat it so you will cut down the odds of finding fish if you target those spots.

    Fish like structure and if you look at the land where it enters the water you can understand the angle etc underwater so you can maybe see where shallow points might go out further with deeper bays on the side of them. Changes in depth close to the side like that are usually good attractors for fish as they have the best of depth (security) and shallows (food) close by.

    Having said that, Another important thing you should keep in mind: You say the dam is pretty large - my biggest problem I personally have with large dams is that i want to try figure the whole dam out on the first day that i get there. By doing that you dilute your chances of figuring out any part of the dam. I would suggest taking a single part of the dam and deciding to focus there. Fish the shallows, depths etc in that portion (eg a single bay) of the dam to try to get an idea of how fish behave in that dam. If you find fish are more in deeper water in that bay, then explore out of the bay in other areas, focusing more on the deep sections. Alternatively if you fish the shallows around the whole dam before trying the deep areas, you might end up only figuring out where the fish like to hang at the end of the day and you have then lost most of the day. That is why i like to try to ignore the urge to explore the whole dam and believe that there are fish in the area i am fishing and stick to it. Next trip to the dam i will fish another bay that looks good and try apply what i learned at the first bay. It's a long process to work out a dam, but i think it gives me more chance to figure out the fish and be able to catch at least some on day one if i focus on a smaller area that has the different traits of the dam in a localised environment.
    "So here’s my point. Don’t go and get your ego all out of proportion because you can tie a fly and catch a fish that’s dumb enough to eat a car key.." - Louis Cahill - Gink and Gasoline

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,040

    Default

    To add to Grant's post.
    If you have been fishing an area for 30 minutes and you had no bumps, knocks, fish, move on, 10 20 or 30 meters.
    Rig up with 2 or 3 flies, that will give you an indication of what the fish are feeding on, i.e. Top dropper - Orange blob, middle fly/1st dropper Dwail bach, hares ear nymph etc, Bottom/point fly- dragon or wooly bugger.
    I like to fish with the wind in my back, so that I can hold my position by finning backwards, pushing against the wind.
    Remember to fish the same spot, at various depths, counting the fly down. i.e. start at the top as the flies land.
    Next cast same spot, count to 3 then 6 then 9 etc

    Remember a bit of snacks and water with you on the tube, and a landing net.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Johannesburg, Gauteng
    Posts
    20

    Default

    You guys are legends. Thanks

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Somerset West
    Posts
    270

    Default

    Get an anchor. I use a piece of thin ski rope with a baksteen. Helps a lot when the wind picks up or if you just want to chill and fish a specific piece of water.

  6. #6

    Default

    Without a lot of weeds or structure I like to move around. If possible, drift with the wind at your back a comfortable casting distance from the shore. If I can get a good drift down a bank, I cast across my body towards the shore and then fin to prevent a loop in the line while I retrieve. Sometimes you need to get the fly a couple of inches from the shore to pick up takes. In overcast/windy conditions the fish will often feel safe enough to stay in the shallows or near the surface for most of the day. In bright/clear conditions they have a tendency to head deeper. If you are really struggling then simply troll until you find the fish - it's the easiest way to cover a lot of water quickly.
    “Apparently people don't like the truth, but I do like it; I like it because it upsets a lot of people. If you show them enough times that their arguments are bullshit, then maybe just once, one of them will say, 'Oh! Wait a minute - I was wrong.' I live for that happening. Rare, I assure you” ― Lemmy Kilmister

    Reap the Whirlwind - WM

    Paradise = A 3wt Rod & a fist full of someone else's #32 parachutes

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dullstroom, Mpumalanga
    Posts
    8,534

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gkieser View Post
    Hi Dean,

    Closer to the banks is where i would start, fishing along them. The sun penetrates to the bottom closer to the edges of a dam so it is more likely for more life to exist there, and if there is more life there, the fish will more likely be there to eat it so you will cut down the odds of finding fish if you target those spots.

    Fish like structure and if you look at the land where it enters the water you can understand the angle etc underwater so you can maybe see where shallow points might go out further with deeper bays on the side of them. Changes in depth close to the side like that are usually good attractors for fish as they have the best of depth (security) and shallows (food) close by.

    Having said that, Another important thing you should keep in mind: You say the dam is pretty large - my biggest problem I personally have with large dams is that i want to try figure the whole dam out on the first day that i get there. By doing that you dilute your chances of figuring out any part of the dam. I would suggest taking a single part of the dam and deciding to focus there. Fish the shallows, depths etc in that portion (eg a single bay) of the dam to try to get an idea of how fish behave in that dam. If you find fish are more in deeper water in that bay, then explore out of the bay in other areas, focusing more on the deep sections. Alternatively if you fish the shallows around the whole dam before trying the deep areas, you might end up only figuring out where the fish like to hang at the end of the day and you have then lost most of the day. That is why i like to try to ignore the urge to explore the whole dam and believe that there are fish in the area i am fishing and stick to it. Next trip to the dam i will fish another bay that looks good and try apply what i learned at the first bay. It's a long process to work out a dam, but i think it gives me more chance to figure out the fish and be able to catch at least some on day one if i focus on a smaller area that has the different traits of the dam in a localised environment.
    Brilliant post! As a relative newcomer to the stillwater scene, there are a few tips here that I will be applying myself. Thanks Grant!
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dean Oelschig View Post
    Hi Guys

    Sorry, last thread from my side, I posted about the float tube last week. Heading off on Wednesday for 5 days near Notties, will report back, hopefully with a video too...

    As I have never fished off a float tube before, I wanted to ask about positioning the float tube in a lake. I realise all lakes are totally different but hoping for some guide as a general rule... The spot we're going to has no weeds or structure as far as I know, is fairly large and I don't have an anchor (currently) to understand the depth (maybe something to get to find a certain depth?)... Is it best to position yourself 10m off the banks and fish along the banks where the depth drops or go into the middle of the dam and hope for the best? Obviously rises will give some indication of the position of fish but any other tips to help will be hugely appreciated. Thanks
    great report back elsewhere on the forum today. now we waiting for some feedback here.
    catch and release

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