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Thread: Vanderkloof trial commercial seine and longline netting approved

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Cape Town
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    Default Vanderkloof trial commercial seine and longline netting approved

    This was reported here http://www.fosaf.co.za/fishingReports.php?id=22. I'm not sure what action needs to be taken? I wouldn't be surprised if there are commercial interests using the 'it's for the underprivileged' meme to get their snouts into the trough of an untapped fishery. This is a capital intensive undertaking and as always when I hear something disturbing happening in the public commons I ask myself cui bono? It's not the poor I can promise you - a few unemployed people will get some piddling wages, the real money will be made elsewhere. Not too dissimilar to the False Bay trekking - a few days wages for guys in the boat and on the beach and the license holder takes most of the benefit (or so I am told).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Western Cape
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    I would like to know more about this. It sounds like a recipe for another eco disaster, but I would like to hear the science and conservation facts before making up my mind.
    Calling fishing a hobby is like calling brain surgery a job - Paul Scullery

  3. #3
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    There is very likely a scientific approach which could create a sustainable commercial fishery. The problem is that this assumes authorities have the ability and willingness to effectively control the fishery and that those with (and without) a legal right to fish comply with the rules. Recent history in South Africa suggests that this is the least likely outcome. Once the door is opened to converting into cash a resource in the public domain the usual 'tragedy of the commons' will likely ensue. Creating a legal, bulk / industrial scale market for freshwater fish is inherently risky and could lead to FW fish being harvested where ever they can be caught by whatever means.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Pretoria Gangsters Paradise
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    That's already happening ... in other places.

    I've seen it before, this netting, even if it is done "legally" and by a "scientific" approach ... means the death of Van Der Kloof as an angler's destination.
    "Hierdie drol het baie vlieŽ" - Ago 2014.

  5. #5
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    Jan 2013
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    North west
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    To me the funniest is that there are actually educated people that believe it will benefit the local under privileged communities. Do they live in the same country as us?

  6. #6
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    Nov 2006
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    Western Cape
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    Why would it not benefit the under priviledged? Im sure they are putting a lot of thought and study into it, and if its done on a controlled and sustainable basis... why not?
    Quote Originally Posted by yella View Post
    To me the funniest is that there are actually educated people that believe it will benefit the local under privileged communities. Do they live in the same country as us?
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  7. #7
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    Cape Town
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    Your faith in 'them' is based on what? Can you name a single example of a well-regulated, sustainably managed fishery that benefits the under-privileged in South Africa? The State in all it's various forms simply cannot be trusted to get anything right on it's own without (a) considerable input from other stakeholders and (b) being subject to relentless scrutiny by the media. Especially true in South Africa but this principle holds for any State anywhere.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern Cape
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    How sad it is. Another natural resourse plundered for short time returns. Surely it makes more economic sense to expand the barbel farming enterprises. How do they not net large mouth? Suposedly protected species? Sombody with credibility in the scientific community needs to expose the facts before we all get shot away.

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