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Thread: Difference between 5/6wt and 5 wt

  1. #1
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    Default Difference between 5/6wt and 5 wt

    Seeing that we have all the clever people on the forum please answer the following:
    What is the difference between a dedicated 5 weight and a 5/6 weight.

    My take on it as I was informed(years ago) is that the 5/6 weight is weighted a 5 for Double tapered lines and 6 for weight forward lines.

    Is this true, and is the rod according to today's standards a 5 weight or 6 weight?

    Pierre

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    Yup, that's true, a 5/6wt rod is an all rounder, 6 wt for distance, like in still water, 5wt for river work where mending and more delicate stuff is required. Probably find its fast for a 5 wt line, and medium to slow for a 6 wt line. Remember that it isn't the rod that is a 5 or 6 wt, its the line that the rod would use. rods don't have a weight rating, only the lines do, so this rod would use either line, dependant on the application. All rounders are for people who would like to own one rod, but use it for two different application, so they only need two lines, not two rods as well. They are more for people starting out.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly-o-holic View Post
    Seeing that we have all the clever people on the forum please answer the following:
    What is the difference between a dedicated 5 weight and a 5/6 weight.


    My take on it as I was informed(years ago) is that the 5/6 weight is weighted a 5 for Double tapered lines and 6 for weight forward lines.

    Is this true, and is the rod according to today's standards a 5 weight or 6 weight?

    Pierre
    Last edited by Andre; 07-08-15 at 02:54 PM.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fly-o-holic View Post
    What is the difference between a dedicated 5 weight and a 5/6 weight.
    About 16.67%
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

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    Quote Originally Posted by smallstreams.co.za View Post
    About 16.67%
    Hey Mario,

    I see you can do some math! Cool churp!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    Yup, that's true, a 5/6wt rod is an all rounder, 6 wt for distance, like in still water, 5wt for river work where mending and more delicate stuff is required. Probably find its fast for a 5 wt line, and medium to slow for a 6 wt line. Remember that it isn't the rod that is a 5 or 6 wt, its the line that the rod would use. rods don't have a weight rating, only the lines do, so this rod would use either line, dependant on the application.
    Ok Andre,

    So, in weight of the rod (actual grams), performance etc, would this be regarded as a 5 or 6?
    I have a GRX 9'6, 5/6 weight. I do believe that your comment above is plausible as the rod is 9'6" for river mending and 6 weight for still water, too heavy for still water?

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fly-o-holic View Post
    Hey Mario,

    I see you can do some math! Cool churp!
    That's not really math - just division

    My take on duel-rated rods has NOTHING to do with being duel-purpose. In my mind, it's all hit-and-hope by the smaller companies who did not bother developing their rods to a correct spec. Iow, let's not make a 5-weight nor a 6-weight, because we'd need to get it JUST right in order to do that, so let's skip some of the finer things to save some bucks.
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  7. #7
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    Why just 5/6? 5/6/7 or 4/5/6/7 would be much more versatile

  8. #8

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    That's the way I see it
    Its well, sort of a 5weight, and ... could also be a 6wt, so let's go for something in the middle.
    The dual rating seems to be more common in some manufacturers low priced rods.
    It would also reduce the range of rods the manufacturer has to produce.
    One mandrel for 5 and six rather than two mandrels.
    In mass production that would make a big difference.

    Quote Originally Posted by smallstreams.co.za View Post
    That's not really math - just division

    My take on duel-rated rods has NOTHING to do with being duel-purpose. In my mind, it's all hit-and-hope by the smaller companies who did not bother developing their rods to a correct spec. Iow, let's not make a 5-weight nor a 6-weight, because we'd need to get it JUST right in order to do that, so let's skip some of the finer things to save some bucks.
    Regards
    Craig

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    I don't think any rod manufacturer is going to advertise to the world that they are complete idiots and don't know how to design rods.
    Read up and you will find quite a lot of information to back up my explanation. I would expect you as a tackle dealer to know a little more about such an elementary subject. Dual rated rods, are designed to be used with more than one line weight, dependent on the fishing application. Its not guess work on the part of the manufacturer. Yes, it is more common in low priced rods, this being because the rod is targeted at the budget conscious fly fisherman who can afford one rod, not two, so needs his one rod to be able to operate effectively over a broader range of fishing situations.
    Quote Originally Posted by ArcherFish View Post
    That's the way I see it
    Its well, sort of a 5weight, and ... could also be a 6wt, so let's go for something in the middle.
    The dual rating seems to be more common in some manufacturers low priced rods.
    It would also reduce the range of rods the manufacturer has to produce.
    One mandrel for 5 and six rather than two mandrels.
    In mass production that would make a big difference.
    Last edited by Andre; 08-08-15 at 10:16 AM.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  10. #10
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    No... the Physical weight of the rod has nothing to do with the line weight that the rod will carry. All rods are rated for the line weight that they will carry, and the 5/6wt label, refers to the dual line capabilities of the rod, and not the rods physical weight.

    I don't understand the second part of your question, pehaps you could rephrase and I can try answer.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly-o-holic View Post
    Ok Andre,

    So, in weight of the rod (actual grams), performance etc, would this be regarded as a 5 or 6?
    I have a GRX 9'6, 5/6 weight. I do believe that your comment above is plausible as the rod is 9'6" for river mending and 6 weight for still water, too heavy for still water?
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

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