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Thread: Rods for beginners

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gael View Post
    Czech nymphing was started by the polish and high sticking by the Americans.

    What we know as Czech nymphing here in SA isn’t actually Czech nymphing but rather a technique called bugging. The Vaal does not enable us to be able to practices true Czech nymphing as the Vaal isn’t a freestone river.

    Any one correct me if I’m wrong, but with high sticking there is still a rod length or more of fly line out of the rod tip and the rod is held high to keep almost/all the fly line off the water.

    With Czech nymphing, you have little on no fly line out of the rod tip and the rod is usually held lower. Basically it came about when the Polish had to compete in an comp (can’t remember against who) and they couldn’t afford to buy fly lines, so they spooled their reels with mono and fished slim heavily weighted flies which they “lobbed” out instead of casted.

    Here is SA, this method of having no fly line out and the leader running into the reel is known as mono-nymphing
    Very interesting Gael! I have never done this kind of fishing, other than trying to winkle a trout out of a hole in a tightly bushed over channel, where just a bit of my leader was out and my rod held low. Sounds pretty much like the same thing. So i take it you have to be in a area where the fish are basically swimming all around you.....muddy water?
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  2. #42
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    Oct 2006
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    Perth
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    Muddy water, not necessarily, the fish just need to be within about 10-15ft away from you and be willing to take a fly.

    I know of some people using Czech / shortline nymphing on the cape streams, it can be a very effective method for fishing under trees and other structure where a strike indicator or dry dropper isn’t an option.

  3. #43

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    To much reading here for me . I start a newbie off on one of two rods that suit a budget and are functional , forgiving and easy to cast.
    trout or youngster 8'6 5/6wt pro cast
    general purpose 6/7 STeaLTH 9067 .

    otherwise I will match a spesific rod to the function required . I do prefer to actually see the person's casting action so if a newbie goes to a good tackle shop then he could get just the rod for his casting action.

  4. #44
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    Dec 2006
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    As funny as it might sound, I still maintain CZN and shortline techniques aren't the be-all and end-all of flyfishing ... thing is the Vaal is very forgiving on bad form and technique and almost anyone who can't even cast a line can catch fish on CZN and SLN techniques.

    Gary and I was having a discussion around this very topic on Sunday. It really is too easy to catch a fish on the Vaal so people storm through the water like buffaloes, don't bother with stalking, technique and presentation and generally speaking I think if the average joe FF could SEE the amount of fish he spooks on the average drift due to bad form it would come as quite a shock. Again, as there are so many fish around, you might not really give a rat's a s s anyway.

    I was reminded yet again, I will focus on approaching the Vaal like a trout stream.

    As for rods, I started out casting a medium/slow Kingfisher Gold 9' 8WT (aka the limp d!ck) and over time my preference has changed to medium fast/fast actioned rods providing they load instantly and I have taken a liking to the 9' TFO TICR-X 7WT when hunting LM and I'm now very keen on a 10' 5WT for SM when you do typically swap between SLN and longer casts.

    IMHO a rod that is a little less stiff works better for SLN and CZN as it allows you to feel the takes better and be more in touch with the flies, providing it has enough backbone to wrestle the bigger SM as well as casting bombs.

    To get back to the topic, for a beginner, a general purpose rod with a medium action is in my view a better choice, typically as you have to be budget concious and will want to fish it in stillwaters for troot and bass and whatnot as well as eventually progress into catching fish in rivers.

    My R0.02
    Last edited by Scythe; 10-01-07 at 02:46 PM.
    "Hierdie drol het baie vlie" - Ago 2014.

  5. #45
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    Oct 2006
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    North of the boerewors curtain
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJB View Post
    To much reading here for me . I start a newbie off on one of two rods that suit a budget and are functional , forgiving and easy to cast.
    trout or youngster 8'6 5/6wt pro cast
    general purpose 6/7 STeaLTH 9067 .

    otherwise I will match a spesific rod to the function required . I do prefer to actually see the person's casting action so if a newbie goes to a good tackle shop then he could get just the rod for his casting action.
    Yup you started me off on a "general purpose 6/7 STeaLTH 9067" and I still use it all the time!
    Check your knots!

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by jock0 View Post
    Yup you started me off on a "general purpose 6/7 STeaLTH 9067" and I still use it all the time!
    Yup they are good rods I have 4 of them and I still fish them

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