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Thread: floating lines

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Waikato
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    I have never used an Airflo Ridge, but I've heard enough critical comments to not go near one. In fact I wouldn't touch an Airflo unless it was a sinker (some people reckon they all are ). Cortlands are good lines. The 444 is great, but if you're buying the 555, make sure you get the Dynatip one, the regular tip is not a good floater - I know, I have one.

    I really like Rio lines - the Grand and the Selective trout are both very good - float like a cork, intelligent tapers and nice durable coating. SA also have nice lines.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Gauteng
    Posts
    274

    Default

    I would agree that there is no real need to cast long distances when fishing the Vaal. Most of the time you'll be fishing closer than 10m. But it is nice to know that the castability of the line on your reel is acceptable. I think that it is important that the floating line you choose actually floats well and for me the old standby, the Cortland 444, has always been a reliable choice. I also like the Hardy lines for their almost zero memory and excellent floatation. The Jim Teeny and Sage lines are also good. There are lines that claim superior floating characteristics, like Rio with their AgentX and some of the new Scientific Anglers lines. I know that the Sci Anglers will be good. I've just never owned one because I cannot justify the high asking price. Some of the chaps on this site will swear by some of the Orvis lines.

    I think an important question question is whether you should choose a double taper or one of the new weight forward lines. I prefer double tapers as, for me at least, they will cast as far as any other line and they are easier to mend (a very important consideration), plus, they are easier to roll cast. But then, I do not know everything. Some of the newer weight forward taper designs are optimised for close quarters work (Sage Quiet Taper, Rio Pocket Water), some claim to go for miles (Airflo 40+), some are very fine presentation tools (Wulff Triangle taper) and some roll cast very well too (Wulff Triangle Taper). Some are also optimised for spey casting with single handed rods, which may be a blessing when you have little room for back casts. These are all things that one read and that makes you scratch your head. Happy hunting and buy the most expensive line that you cannot really afford. It is a more important piece of equipment than your rod and reel.
    If everybody is thinking alike, nobody's thinking - George Patton

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    gauteng
    Posts
    11

    Default floating lines

    a million thanx to you all!!!would love to join you guys.havent looked at the date yet but will now and get back to you.in the mean time am going to arends nes on sunday!cant wait.my main gripe with my existing line was the tip keeps sinking after a little time of use!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    715

    Default

    I would have to agree, the Cortland lines are hard to beat, even the cheaper ranges are pretty good.

    As mentioned in previous threads, I ahve already explained my experience with the Airfo Ridge lines.
    Fly-fishing surpasses the need to actually catch a fish, it becomes a mindset, and with time, an obsession.

    Lord,grant that I may catch a fish so big that even I,
    When speaking afterwards,
    May have no need to lie.
    Amen

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