Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Trout Stocking

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Western Cape
    Posts
    7,613

    Default Trout Stocking

    Are there any guys out there who have any experience with first time stockings of trout in dams.
    What does one have to look for in terms of
    Dam size for numbers of first time stockies?
    Any water tests need to be done?

    I have a friend who has recently bought a farm in the Boland somewhere, and has asked me to investigate stocking his dams it for him.....where should I start?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Sunninghill JHB
    Posts
    2,307

    Default

    Phone the Rhodes University, ask for Martin Davis, and take it from there...

    He does not use email, nor own a cell phone, leave a message with his "PA" and he will get back to you.

    I have another contact, if needed, I will mail him...
    Mike McKeown

    You're either fishing or waiting...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dullstroom, Mpumalanga
    Posts
    8,534

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    Are there any guys out there who have any experience with first time stockings of trout in dams.
    What does one have to look for in terms of
    Dam size for numbers of first time stockies?
    Any water tests need to be done?

    I have a friend who has recently bought a farm in the Boland somewhere, and has asked me to investigate stocking his dams it for him.....where should I start?
    Hi Andre

    From my experiences, your biggest problem here in the Cape would be fluctuating water levels. I would firstly establish just how low the dam gets in Summer. Ideally you need at least 3 metres but preferably 5 metres of depth when the dam is at its lowest. Take note of loose drifting weed growth in the dam, there are certain undesirables that can choke up a dam in no time, rendering it completely unfishable. As far as water quality goes, a quick visual indication can tell one a lot. If there is any brown peat in the water, chances are that the water will be too acidic for trout. If the water appears to be clear and tastes 'sweet', I would take a chance.

    As far as numbers are concerned, I once stocked a dam about half the size of a rugby field with 30 wild adult fish that I caught and transported from somewhere else. These 30 went on to more than double their weight in the first year and provided me with more than enough action every time I fished the dam. If you are stocking with fingerlings upto 40grams each, just remember that you need to work on a survival rate of 10%. So, for a dam half the size of a rugby field, I would put in about 500 40gram fish, which would bring me back to about 50 fish. This would be more than enough if you want quality well conditioned fish. Proportionately you can increase the numbers to suit the size of the dam you intend stocking. Good luck!
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    9,030

    Default

    Contact 3 Streams trout in Franschhoek.
    they are very knowledgable. They do most of the stockings in the Cape.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    Are there any guys out there who have any experience with first time stockings of trout in dams.
    What does one have to look for in terms of
    Dam size for numbers of first time stockies?
    Any water tests need to be done?

    I have a friend who has recently bought a farm in the Boland somewhere, and has asked me to investigate stocking his dams it for him.....where should I start?
    Andre

    Stocking trout in waters that have never held trout will be an almost impossible undertaking (if done legally that is).

    You will need an EIA done, as well as obtain the 3 minimum required permits to move live trout or eggs.

    Best place to start would be CNC.
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Claremont, Cape Town
    Posts
    4,251

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MaXiMuM View Post
    Phone the Rhodes University, ask for Martin Davis, and take it from there...

    He does not use email, nor own a cell phone, leave a message with his "PA" and he will get back to you.
    you will get no better advice than from the mad Welshman!!!
    I always wanted to be somebody,but now I realize I should have been more specific.
    Alcohol is the anaesthesia by which we endure the operation of life. GBS

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    A, A
    Posts
    1,745

    Default

    Contact Malcolm Meintjes, he is also very knowledgable on the subject and currently controlling the stocking strategies for several still waters.
    PK

    I am haunted by waters - Norman Maclean

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Pretoria Gangsters Paradise
    Posts
    5,735

    Default

    All the comments made are very valid.

    Check the quality and temperature of water. Also if you have a good constant supply of fresh water 9ie: a strong perennial feeder) then you can increase the numbers mentioned. Herr Shelton has used very 'safe' numbers to ensure good quality sized fish.

    As a general rule for fish over 1.5Kgs, you want at least 1m^3 of water per fish, providing you have good natural filtration in addition to water of the right temperature, which is again affected by quality and quantity of supply and depth.

    Ofcourse, you also need good gas exchange processes and things like weed, watergrass and otther biological residents have to be taken into consideration.

    WRT the permitting, I don't foresee you should have problems, providing your stillwater is is no way connected to other running water systems like rivers or streams.
    "Hierdie drol het baie vlieŽ" - Ago 2014.

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scythe View Post
    Ofcourse, you also need good gas exchange processes and things like weed, watergrass and otther biological residents have to be taken into consideration.

    WRT the permitting, I don't foresee you should have problems, providing your stillwater is is no way connected to other running water systems like rivers or streams.
    Hmmm, not according to NEMBA and the Biodiverstity Act. Will see if I can find the documentation sent to us a while back - should still have it somewhere.
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Sunninghill JHB
    Posts
    2,307

    Default

    Yip, that’s what I thought. It is illegal to stock any water, under the current legislation... unless you are a valid permit holder for the action you intend doing...
    Mike McKeown

    You're either fishing or waiting...

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •