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Thread: "Tags" for different weight flies?

  1. #11
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    Dec 2006
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    Vandia Grove, Gauteng
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    I put a dot of appropriate Koki pen colour on top of the finished thread head
    and use a lighter colour system if it's black or dark thread. I usually only use three codes. When I get the fly out I weight it in my hand by throwing it up and down and if all feels OK I put it on the leader and see how if performs wet in the shallows before fishing with it. Just a few thoughts from my side
    The more you know, the less you need (Aboriginal Australian proverb)

    Only dead fish swim with the stream (Malcolm Muggeridge)

  2. #12
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    Nov 2007
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    North West
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    Hmmmm, split shots..... now there is something worth looking into!

    Might make for the least confusion.

  3. #13
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    Paint them fluo orange and add a hook to them for ultra-fast egg pattern...
    The more you know, the less you need (Aboriginal Australian proverb)

    Only dead fish swim with the stream (Malcolm Muggeridge)

  4. #14
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    Dec 2006
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    Gauteng
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morne View Post
    Hi guys

    I have read in a couple of books where guys tie in a tag to indentify different weight flies. Some use differnent colour threads, others use nail varnice, etc.
    I keep it simple - flies are either unweighted by design (eg softhackles), non-beaded (standard nymphs - a couple of turns of lead in the thorax), or have either a brass bead (light weight) or tungsten bead (heavy weight).

    That said, I normally fish tungsten and would rather go to a size SMALLER tungsten than the same size fly with a brass bead (I fish tungstens down to #20). The smaller (but denser) tungsten gets down better than the bigger, less dense (but possibly the same weight brass fly) - getting to depth sooner is almost always better.

    This also keeps fly boxes & fly selections simple.
    Gary
    Flytyer - Where great flytying begins

  5. #15
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    Sep 2006
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    Waikato
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    I'm similar to Gary. Except all my beads are tungsten. For fishing shallowish water I use nymphs with no beads (just some lead wraps). If I need to go deeper I use nymphs with a tungsten bead. Deeper still and I use a bigger fly with a bigger bead, often with a smaller unweighted nymph trailing. Deeper still and I use 2 big tungsten nymphs.
    Life is a series of trout missions with that numbing feeling in between...

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  6. #16
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    Sep 2006
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    Waikato
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris williams View Post
    Paint them fluo orange and add a hook to them for ultra-fast egg pattern...
    You're onto it Chris, fluro-orange beads work very well at times:
    Life is a series of trout missions with that numbing feeling in between...

    My Album

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Elliott View Post
    I'm similar to Gary. Except all my beads are tungsten. For fishing shallowish water I use nymphs with no beads (just some lead wraps). If I need to go deeper I use nymphs with a tungsten bead. Deeper still and I use a bigger fly with a bigger bead, often with a smaller unweighted nymph trailing. Deeper still and I use 2 big tungsten nymphs.
    To clarify:

    I actually use very little brass - generally only when I want a bit more flash/action/colour (i use gold, black nickel & copper beads), but without any real weight.
    Gary
    Flytyer - Where great flytying begins

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