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Thread: Photographing Flies

  1. #11
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    I've finally managed to take a fairly decent quality picture of a fly. My old camera was fine, I just had to get the settings right. The other trick is to use natural light so I took the picture outside, in the shade.

    So now that I can do this, prepare to be bombarded with pictures. Here is one that I took and submitted on the main site:


  2. #12
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    Very nice looking fly Kevin. The difficult part of macro photography is choosing your point of focus carefully and then stopping the lens right down to allow for maximum depth of field. I try to focus on the glint on the head varnish or on the hook itself. If this comes up sharp then generally the photo will look sharp, despite some of the hackle ends losing some sharpness due to reduced depth of field at high magnification.
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Shelton View Post
    The difficult part of macro photography is choosing your point of focus carefully and then stopping the lens right down to allow for maximum depth of field
    Chris, can you please explain what you mean by "stopping the lens right down" - sorry, me dof.

  4. #14
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    What you need to do is select your smallest aperture. This will obviously lengthen your exposure if you are not using a flash, so it will be necessary to tripod mount your camera, to eliminate camera shake.
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  5. #15
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    Ummm, what language are you guys using? This sounds like good advice but I don't understand any of it. I guess I'd better do some more research to understand basic photographic terms.

  6. #16
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    Sorry Kevin, I failed to mention that this only really applies to cameras that have an aperture priority. If you are using a point and shoot camera, then you wont have any control over aperture, so the best would be to move back from your subject a bit, shoot on best resolution and then crop and enlarge the fly in photoshop or a similar image manipulation application. I hope I have not confused you even more now!
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  7. #17
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    Nah mate, I can understand that. It must be English. Thanks Chris.

    PS. What is a decent picture manipulation software program?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Elliott View Post
    PS. What is a decent picture manipulation software program?
    that'd be Adobe Photoshop. it's pretty amazing what you can do with that piece of software
    the patient mental...

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpammenter View Post
    that'd be Adobe Photoshop. it's pretty amazing what you can do with that piece of software
    Yip, nothing to beat photoshop. It is the single most accepted application in the publishing and media industry.
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  10. #20
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    I had photography as a subject whilst studying, look I can’t remember all the specifics but here are a few pointers anyway.
    1.) Lighting - Different types of light sources (Tungsten, etc.) gives different colour effects thus interfering with the original colour of the fly. Natural light is the best but not direct light, use a reflector like a piece of white cardboard to reflect the light softly on the subject matter.
    2.) F stop and aperture - A small F stop (2.8) would mean one would get a minimum depth of field which you want in order to achieve a blurred back ground. This would also mean that you have a large aperture (lots of light) which would reduce the chances of shake-blur because of the fast shutter speed (all these settings are relative to one another) and vice versa.
    3.) Use a close up lens.

    Go check out this link for finer details.
    http://www.photo.net/learn/macro/
    No PAIN No Gain

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