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Thread: Of Streams and Purists

  1. #1
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    Default Of Streams and Purists

    Towards the end of last season I succumbed to a bit of pier pressure and tried my hand at a bit of nymphing on the streams and while I caught my fair share of trout doing so, I can't really say that I enjoyed the experience. I guess I am a dry fly purist afterall, so this season I will be going back to old habits and fishing the way I enjoy fishing, afterall, this is what it is about, enjoying ourselves and fishing the way we like to fish, not so? Whilst I have absolutely nothing against the use of nymphs on the streams, my preference is for the dry simply because of the way it is fished, fishing on the move, covering more water, with not more than three drifts per lie.

    My question is, am I the only guy who enjoys fishing like this? Are dry fly purists a dying breed?
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Shelton View Post
    Towards the end of last season I succumbed to a bit of pier pressure and tried my hand at a bit of nymphing on the streams and while I caught my fair share of trout doing so, I can't really say that I enjoyed the experience. I guess I am a dry fly purist afterall, so this season I will be going back to old habits and fishing the way I enjoy fishing, afterall, this is what it is about, enjoying ourselves and fishing the way we like to fish, not so? Whilst I have absolutely nothing against the use of nymphs on the streams, my preference is for the dry simply because of the way it is fished, fishing on the move, covering more water, with not more than three drifts per lie.

    My question is, am I the only guy who enjoys fishing like this? Are dry fly purists a dying breed?
    Leonard Williams will definitely agree with you Chris. I can't say because I have not done this yet. Hoping to this season though.
    Clive

    "One final cast for luck, and the really last throw in honour of a fair lady ... If they don't rise to that, they are no gentlemen" - Anon

  3. #3
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    Hi Chris

    Dry fly fishning remains my favorite for trout. Even on stillwaters. Fishing streamer patters on sinking lines dont really excite me and i get bored quickly. But thats stillwaters, as you know i'm only getting into the streams and after this season i might be able to comment more. But i would think that dry fly fishing will also appeal to me here. You cant beat the visual of topwater action.

  4. Default

    The Skues, Halford, Sawyer - which is right?
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Shelton View Post
    Towards the end of last season I succumbed to a bit of pier pressure and tried my hand at a bit of nymphing on the streams and while I caught my fair share of trout doing so, I can't really say that I enjoyed the experience. I guess I am a dry fly purist afterall, so this season I will be going back to old habits and fishing the way I enjoy fishing, afterall, this is what it is about, enjoying ourselves and fishing the way we like to fish, not so? Whilst I have absolutely nothing against the use of nymphs on the streams, my preference is for the dry simply because of the way it is fished, fishing on the move, covering more water, with not more than three drifts per lie.

    My question is, am I the only guy who enjoys fishing like this? Are dry fly purists a dying breed?
    Not all Chris! At the risk of sounding one dimensional, I too consider myself a dryfly purist. Simply put, it is the most exciting form of FF. Seeing that first trout taking your Adams you will never go back!

    Stalking fish in ultra-thin water with tiny dryflies and light tippets, what can be more exciting?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by smallstreams.co.za View Post
    The Skues, Halford, Sawyer - which is right?
    I don't think any of those gentlemen were necessarily "right" or wrong ... morality has nothing to do with the issue. I really enjoy reading those gentlemen's polite arguments, and still regard them as the all-time greats of fly-fishing!

    It is all about preference I think. Fishing a nymph, as suggested by Sawyer needs just as much skill and finesse as presenting a dry. Blind nymph fishing, or Czech nymphing is possibly another issue altogether (see recent post by "Kingfisher" regarding CZ nymphing)
    I always wanted to be somebody,but now I realize I should have been more specific.
    Alcohol is the anaesthesia by which we endure the operation of life. GBS

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by shector View Post
    Not all Chris! At the risk of sounding one dimensional, I too consider myself a dryfly purist. Simply put, it is the most exciting form of FF. Seeing that first trout taking your Adams you will never go back!

    Stalking fish in ultra-thin water with tiny dryflies and light tippets, what can be more exciting?
    What is more exciting? Nymphing for them with with micro nymphs.

    To fish for rising fish, is like getting a tame buck to eat from you hand and while he is casually and trusting, eating from you hand, hitting him over the head with a hammer.

    Fish a whole day with a #18 PTN. With a leader setup of 12 to 18 feet. Not only casting to fish you can see but to where you think a fish should be. There is a big difference to cast to fish you can see and reading the water and fishing to where your 6th sense tells you, there should be a fish and then catching that fish.

    Test you trout hunting and water reading abilities. Nymph with small flies and let me know how you fared.
    Korrie Broos

    Don't go knocking on Death's door, ring the bell and run like hell. He hates it. (anon)
    Nymphing, adds depth to your fly fishing.
    Nymphing, is fly fishing in another dimension

  8. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasper View Post
    I don't think any of those gentlemen were necessarily "right" or wrong ... morality has nothing to do with the issue. I really enjoy reading those gentlemen's polite arguments, and still regard them as the all-time greats of fly-fishing!

    It is all about preference I think. Fishing a nymph, as suggested by Sawyer needs just as much skill and finesse as presenting a dry. Blind nymph fishing, or Czech nymphing is possibly another issue altogether (see recent post by "Kingfisher" regarding CZ nymphing)
    If you were close by, I'd hug you!! Good post Jasper!!!
    Mario Geldenhuys
    Smallstream fanatic, plus I do some other things that I can't tell you about

    "All the tips or magical insights in the world can't replace devotion, dedication, commitment, and gumption - and there is not secret in that" - Glenn Brackett

  9. #9
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    Hi Pierre. After fishing with a number of guys over the past 3 seasons who follow both disciplines, I've come to the conclusion that the mindsets of the anglers who follow either disciplines are different. In my opinion the nymph fisherman is more a numbers guy and will really work a pool or a run until he is convinced that he has winkled out every trout in the vicinity. The dry fly guy on the other hand is more choosy about the type of water he likes to fish and happy to pass up deeper holding water where he knows the bigger fish lie in exchange for thinner pocket water where trout have to expend the least amount of energy to rise to the surface to a free drifting fly. Over the years I've learnt to read the kind of water that is more suitable to the dry fly and my eye is constantly on the lookout for these smaller holding pockets that at the most hold one trout that I know will rise to a free drifting fly.

    I have overheard certain competitive fly fishermen saying that they will only fish with another provided the guy fishes like a gentleman and doesnt rush through the water. I am sorry to say, but if that is the case, then I guess I'm not a gentleman! Just like I'll frustrate the hell out of the nymph angler by wanting to move onto the next pocket after two or three drifts, I get equally frustrated by having to wait an hour for a nymph fisherman to thoroughly fish one pool.

    From a competitive point of view, where numbers is the thing, I personally don't think the two should ever fish together because either one of the disciplines will handicap the other and the amount of fish caught is definitely not a fair indication of the individual talents of the anglers at the end of the day. I've fished with guys who only fish the dry, and the quicker pace of fishing is pretty much the norm. Ok, there is the odd guy who will want to drift a dry over one lie 20 times, and then still want to do a fly change for another 20 drifts, but that is only because of lack of experience. With time he will also soon realise that this is wasting time. Experience has taught me that 3 drifts per pocket or lie is all that is needed. You are then faced with three choices, either change fly, rest the pool, or move on!
    Last edited by Chris Shelton; 02-09-08 at 08:50 AM.
    "Innocence is a wild trout. But we humans, being complicated, have to pursue innocence in complex ways" - Datus Proper

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jasper View Post
    Blind nymph fishing
    I always make sure my nymphs have eyes!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasper View Post
    Czech nymphing is possibly another issue altogether
    Czech/shortline/mono/french nymphing is probably one of the hardest skills to master. When you fish with someone who really knows what they are doing you realise how technical and difficult to master this style of fishing really is. While you can plop in three nymphs and catch the odd fish and tell yourself it's boring (which I have done on many occasions) you could also try and learn a new skill.

    Another skill I am keen to try and improve on is small bugger fishing for yellows as practised by Jacque Marais and others. This is another skill that when you first look at it looks easy until you realise the difference in drifts, difficulty of picking up subtle takes etc. I thought I knew how to fish buggers until I watched someone like Jacque doing it then I realised I actually knew very little.

    While I love fishing dries, I tend to try and match the technique to the type/depth of water I am fishing and the species I am targetting. Anyone tried czech nymphing gullies in the salt - could be an effective technique with a long rod?
    “Apparently people don't like the truth, but I do like it; I like it because it upsets a lot of people. If you show them enough times that their arguments are bullshit, then maybe just once, one of them will say, 'Oh! Wait a minute - I was wrong.' I live for that happening. Rare, I assure you” ― Lemmy Kilmister

    Reap the Whirlwind - WM

    Paradise = A 3wt Rod & a fist full of someone else's #32 parachutes

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