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Thread: Techniques for tigerfish

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mpumalanga
    Posts
    2

    Default Techniques for tigerfish

    Hi Guys

    Will be in the Lower Zambezi for a while, and i have never caught a tiger on fly....

    Some pointers would be appreciated. Which areas would you focus on fast deep channels or structure?

    I have read that tiger in the LZNP prefer blue and white flies because of the amount of Kapenta in the system... truth to this?

    Etienne

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Western Cape
    Posts
    7,613

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wenwe View Post
    Hi Guys

    Will be in the Lower Zambezi for a while, and i have never caught a tiger on fly....

    Some pointers would be appreciated. Which areas would you focus on fast deep channels or structure?

    I have read that tiger in the LZNP prefer blue and white flies because of the amount of Kapenta in the system... truth to this?

    Etienne
    Tigers are predators, and therefore will be found wherever their food is, so look out for likely places that offer protection to the smaller bait fish. Always good to fish towards the banks, let the line take the fly down and accross, and strip as the line straightens out as it swings past. On the Lower Zambezi, Chobe etc, you will probably have a guide who will give you good pointers as to where the fish are found. One thing they tend to do, which irritates me, is they tend to tie the boat up against the reeds on the side, and make you fish down stream, and retrieve back up. I far prefer to have the boat anchored in the river, within casting distance of the edges.
    As far as flies are concerned, everyone has their favorite, and although blue and white will probably be good, black and orange will also be good. Pretty much any colour. The later in the day it gets, and as the light fades, you will find that darker colours will perform better.
    When striking a tiger fish, remember that they have very hard mouths, so you need to strike like a bass master to get the hook to set. Once hooked, you need to give it as little line as possible, else you will either lose him, or you won't get the characteristic jump. After a leap or two, simply winch him in. Most tigers tend to put everything in the hit and jump, and give up the fight after a little while. Due to the deep water, the fish tend to go down, and you won't have many fast line stripping runs.
    Also remeber that tigers are very fragile fish, and should always be netted into the boat. When hholding the fish with a boga grip, always support the tail, and never ever hold a tiger fish by the tail alone. The bigger ones can suffer from spine dislocation and die.
    Also use a wire trace onto the fly, to prevent bite offs, and fish swimming around with hooks in their mouths.
    Enjoy, tigers are great fun, and insanely strong fish .
    Oh yes, remeber that flies tied with synthetic materials will out last flies that are tied with buck tail. if you tthink you have enough flies for the trip, then you must double the number, and then double it again. You will be horrified at the number of flies you willgo through, before you even land a fish. Some flies last only one hit, before they are shredded, and useless.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Vanderbijlpark
    Posts
    7,317

    Default

    Good post Andre.

    Now the fillyflabbers can see that there are informative posts on the forum
    It's not in the catching, it's in the learning something new.
    view albums at. http://www.flytalk.co.za/forum/album.php?u=659

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Jhb
    Posts
    47

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    Also fish the structures when drifting passed islands.You will find the smaller tigers get to the fly quicker than the larger ones, when that happens try pull the fly away from them so the larger guys can catch up.
    Some great fishing for the smaller ones on a 5 weight!
    Also fish the channels - deeper water characterised by that "skuim" on the surface.
    I use DI5 and Di7 sinking lines depending on the flow of the river. Blue and white worked well. When using DI 5/7 line be SURE to wear a finger guard (some of us have our sargeants stripes) and NOT neoprene ones (unless you tape it with elastoplast as a last resort).
    Another tip is to take some netting (shadecloth) so your line lies on this on the boat and does'nt get hooked on anything (especially your ankles) lying around on the boat.
    Tigers fight hard , so when releasing make sure they are properly revived.
    I know the lower zambezi quite well , so PM me if you need any more info.

  5. #5

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    Ettienne

    Try to get hold of the guys at Fly Cast Away - they may have some advice.

    Well since you are going to be living there I think you need to either take a suitecase full off flies - learn to tie - or find soemthing natural in the area. If in 4-Ways go have a chat with Murray Pedder on how to tie the flies.

    Another option is to float a skin strip on a circle hook in the current - but that is not cricket;-) Saw it on Hunt for Big Fish!

  6. #6

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    Hi Wenwe

    Where will you be based down in the LZ? I've been here for 5 years now and have found that blue & white as well as chartreuse & white seem to be the most effective patterns for tigers. We generally drift just off the bank and throw at structure and small bays, these hold a surprising amount of larger fish (4 kg+) as well as rats and mice sometimes. Please don't hesitate to give me a shout if you need more info.

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