Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Thread: The colour orange.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Somerset West
    Posts
    993

    Default The colour orange.

    Orange has proved to be an excellent fish fooling colour. Any ideas from you guys why this is the case, since there is not many "oranges" in a fish's world.

    Maybe because it was the first colour he saw inside the eggsac?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Waikato
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fish View Post
    Maybe because it was the first colour he saw inside the eggsac?
    I think that you have answered your own question: EGGS. Fish love em. I think red setter (actually orange), that hideous thing called an "Orangeade" and glo-bugs as used to target both trout and salmon on their spawning runs.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    CPT
    Posts
    2,623

    Default

    I think that different colours appear different under water, especially the deeper you go. Eg. Orange could appear to be an olive under water. I have read about this somewhere but just cant remember exactly where it was.
    Daryl Human

    The solution to any problem -- work, love, money, whatever -- is to go fishing, and the worse the problem, the longer the trip should be. --John Gierach

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Vanderbijlpark
    Posts
    7,317

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dizzy View Post
    I think that different colours appear different under water, especially the deeper you go. Eg. Orange could appear to be an olive under water. I have read about this somewhere but just cant remember exactly where it was.
    Possibly in Bill Hansford Steele's? "Bible" on flyfishing in Southern Africa ?
    It's not in the catching, it's in the learning something new.
    view albums at. http://www.flytalk.co.za/forum/album.php?u=659

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    CPT
    Posts
    2,623

    Default

    I think you may just be right Herman. I'll check tonight.
    Daryl Human

    The solution to any problem -- work, love, money, whatever -- is to go fishing, and the worse the problem, the longer the trip should be. --John Gierach

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dullstroom, Mpumalanga
    Posts
    8,534

    Default

    I once read an article on salmon streams. The theory as to how the salmon manage to find the exact stream they grew up in, after spending a few years in the sea goes along these lines.

    The salmon that die after spawning become food parcels, which eventually disintegrate into smaller decaying particles, which combined with the unique chemistry of the particular stream, taint it with it's own unique flavour and aroma as it were. The young salmon spend a few years in the stream and become highly in tune with the chemistry and flavour of the stream, and this information is stored forever in the sensory recesses of their memory.

    Furthermore, the decaying particles of flesh become a valuable food source in the stream. These decaying particles range in colour from orange through to green and blue...........hence the attractive qualities of highly coloured salmon flies, of which the colour orange plays a big part.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Blouberg
    Posts
    1,745

    Default

    Vis

    Read an article in a recent "Trout and Salmon" where they strongly advise against using red or orange on flies as the fish assosciate this with danger etc. (Can't remember the exact details).

    After having tried Darryl's hotspot nymphs (using the orange bead head), I can only state that I was amazed at the effectiveness of this colour. My own nymphs had a gold colour bead head and were getting "so so" attention from the trout. In stark contrast, the hotspot nymphs were attacked with aggression. I've never seen the like in all my years of flyfishing.

    Do'nt know where the Brit who wrote the article got his info from but he's dead wrong. Similarly the colour red has proven effectiveness over the years on flies such as the Royal Wulff, Royal Coachman and RAB.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NeilRowe View Post
    Vis

    Read an article in a recent "Trout and Salmon" where they strongly advise against using red or orange on flies as the fish assosciate this with danger etc. (Can't remember the exact details).

    After having tried Darryl's hotspot nymphs (using the orange bead head), I can only state that I was amazed at the effectiveness of this colour. My own nymphs had a gold colour bead head and were getting "so so" attention from the trout. In stark contrast, the hotspot nymphs were attacked with aggression. I've never seen the like in all my years of flyfishing.

    Do'nt know where the Brit who wrote the article got his info from but he's dead wrong. Similarly the colour red has proven effectiveness over the years on flies such as the Royal Wulff, Royal Coachman and RAB.
    You probably don't soak your flies in earthworms ?
    “Apparently people don't like the truth, but I do like it; I like it because it upsets a lot of people. If you show them enough times that their arguments are bullshit, then maybe just once, one of them will say, 'Oh! Wait a minute - I was wrong.' I live for that happening. Rare, I assure you” ― Lemmy Kilmister

    Reap the Whirlwind - WM

    Paradise = A 3wt Rod & a fist full of someone else's #32 parachutes

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Waikato
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dlampert View Post
    You probably don't soak your flies in earthworms ?
    that would probably work Darryl.

    The globug is a very effective fly when fishing the Taupo tributaries for running fish in winter. But one guide is rumoured to soak his globugs overnight in roe. His clients are very successful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    97

    Default

    Fish

    It is something I mentioned to you the other day at the shop, which I would like to hear other opinions on.

    As far as I am aware, biology was a long time ago, each species has a different configuration of rods and cones in their eyes. This results in them seeing the world differently to us. What we may perceive as orange may appear as something completely different to the fish.

    What would be a very interesting exercise is to find out from a zoologist, (of the phish kind), just what images the fish's eye is capable of receiving. Once you have the resolution and colour spectrum you can then take a picture of the fly and alter it in photo-shop to create some semblance of what the fish sees. I don't know if it is possible but worth a try.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •