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Thread: Id of fish??

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by markdej View Post
    Not really... Isnt the fish in that pic of yours an Orange fin Barb?
    Ag you monkey - unless they escaped from someone's aquarium and made their way into the western cape I am pretty sure it is not.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Taylor View Post
    Yup, definitley Red fin minnows -Pseudobarbus spp. an indigenous and often threatened genus.
    What stream were they in? The species are pretty area specific.
    Hi Francois stays on a farm just outside wellington. We discovered the minnows in the stream, that drizzle (can't call it flow )passed his home, over the weekend. We always thought that there were no fish in the water. We inspect it every time I go there, Force of habit Only to see these little guys under the tree trunk. As Francois said we first thought they were tadpoles (were observing from the road) then realized that they don't swim like tadpoles. Closer inspection confirmed our suspicion.
    The worst day of fishing is better that the best day at work

  3. #23

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    Then it's probably a Pseudobarbus burgi - the Berg River Redfin. Occurs in tribs of the Berg River and previously in the Eerste. (now extinct in the Eerste River system). Its conservation status is critically endangered due to habitat destruction and invasive predatory fish.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by redhumpy View Post
    So you agree it is predatory?
    Oh yes! Certainly trout are aggressive predators. Ask trout anglers whether they feel trout should have been introduced in the first place and most would say it was altogether a bad idea.

    HOWEVER

    Would I be happier if there were no trout to be caught in the WC streams? definately not! Stopping me fishing the streams would be like ripping out a part of my soul.

    I am (as I believe most flyfishers to be) rich in contradictions.

    The difference between trout and the other introduced species is that trout have a very narrow tolerance for temperatures. This means that in SA they can only survive at the very top of the streams they inhabit and are unlikely to be able to invade. Bass and Barbel on the other hand have a very wide temperature tolerance and are thus very successful invaders.

    My earlier point, though, was that trout and redfins are able to co-exist, but bass and redfins are not.
    Last edited by Mike Taylor; 17-03-11 at 06:45 PM.

  5. #25
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    Mike
    Check your PM's

  6. #26

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    These little chaps (or rather their Clanwilliam cousins Barbus calidus) could be great fun on dry fly -for those who aren't interested in fighting large fish. I was fishing the Rondegat for Clanwilliam yellows and my dry kept being nailed by redfins. Eventually I hooked one on a #12 para RAB that was half the size of the redfin.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Taylor View Post
    Oh yes! Certainly trout are aggressive predators. Ask trout anglers whether they feel trout should have been introduced in the first place and most would say it was altogether a bad idea.

    HOWEVER

    Would I be happier if there were no trout to be caught in the WC streams? definately not! Stopping me fishing the streams would be like ripping out a part of my soul.

    I am (as I believe most flyfishers to be) rich in contradictions.

    The difference between trout and the other introduced species is that trout have a very narrow tolerance for temperatures. This means that in SA they can only survive at the very top of the streams they inhabit and are unlikely to be able to invade. Bass and Barbel on the other hand have a very wide temperature tolerance and are thus very successful invaders.

    My earlier point, though, was that trout and redfins are able to co-exist, but bass and redfins are not.
    Ya, pretty much quite right, although, the Smalblaar is hoter than the Breede in summer, yet, no trout in the Breede, and they were stocked there. I think the trouts tolerance to the temperature of our streams has been a result of their adaptation over generations. This would explain why so many of the "accidental stockies" that got into the system, have died when the water warmed up, but the wild fish have survived. Trout are self localising, and pretty much because of the narrow band of conditions that they require, which has a lot to do with the PH of the water as well , among other things. Another interesting question, is around the browns in the Witte and Witels. How have they survived? Both browns and rainbows were originally stocked in all the rivers, but the browns survived where the rainbows died out, and the rainbows survived where the browns didn't. Also, the Holsloot has always been colder than the other rivers, and probably the most consistent temperature, yet only one particular strain of rainbows managed to last the distance there., the tolerance of the trout is dependent on a lot of different things, and different strains, have different tolerances. Yes temperature is a major factor, but our rivers can have variations between 7 or 8 degrees in the coldest parts of winter, to around upwards of 24 degrees in the hottest summer days. This isn't a narrow temperature band at all, in fact, I doubt that there are very many species which could happilly handle those kinds of variations, yet the rainbows in the Smalblaar seem to be fine.
    Disclaimer.... none of my posts are intended to be "expert advice"..just opinions from someone who is willing to help where he can.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    Ya, pretty much quite right, although, the Smalblaar is hoter than the Breede in summer, yet, no trout in the Breede, and they were stocked there. I think the trouts tolerance to the temperature of our streams has been a result of their adaptation over generations. This would explain why so many of the "accidental stockies" that got into the system, have died when the water warmed up, but the wild fish have survived. Trout are self localising, and pretty much because of the narrow band of conditions that they require, which has a lot to do with the PH of the water as well , among other things. Another interesting question, is around the browns in the Witte and Witels. How have they survived? Both browns and rainbows were originally stocked in all the rivers, but the browns survived where the rainbows died out, and the rainbows survived where the browns didn't. Also, the Holsloot has always been colder than the other rivers, and probably the most consistent temperature, yet only one particular strain of rainbows managed to last the distance there., the tolerance of the trout is dependent on a lot of different things, and different strains, have different tolerances. Yes temperature is a major factor, but our rivers can have variations between 7 or 8 degrees in the coldest parts of winter, to around upwards of 24 degrees in the hottest summer days. This isn't a narrow temperature band at all, in fact, I doubt that there are very many species which could happilly handle those kinds of variations, yet the rainbows in the Smalblaar seem to be fine.
    Andre there are trout in the breede! i have a mate who has recently caught a few on spinner!

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