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Thread: 2 Flies and how would you fish then

  1. #11

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    Check out the weather before you go. Some pretty nasty stuff predicted for the next few days in that area.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Eastern Cape
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Taylor View Post
    Check out the weather before you go. Some pretty nasty stuff predicted for the next few days in that area.
    True, but catching trout in snowy weather is fun, (check out Lake Sneeuberg thread), problem is!!!!!! DONT GET SNOWED IN. can take a week or more to get out. Lesotho, worse.

    Good tip Mike.

    DAVE
    Handle every situation like a dog.- If you cant hump it, piss on it and walk away. --JASPER.

  3. #13
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    Sep 2006
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    Be sure to get yourself some Papa Roaches. Fish just can't seem to leave those things alone where ever you are fishing.

    For winter, my other fly would be a Pancora Woolly Bugger.

    If i could take a Third it would be the famed DaphneBlob!! (Chartreuse Blob - immitates Daphnia perfectly )

    Fish them both in every way you can think of!

    In the Kamberg festival a few weekends ago we found ourselves on a high mountain dam at 06h00 with -4 temps. The line was freezing to the eyes so we had to strip pretty fast to keep the line from freezing to the guides. Luckily it is what the fish wanted. The Papa Roaches or other big dragon immitations would hit the water and you start stripping, and the next thing you see a bow wave following the fly. All you gotta do is stop for a second, and he nails it and you're on! We eventually had the rods under our arms, double handed stripping! That was a freakin exciting morning! The point is, that's not the way one would usually fish dragon immitations, and had it not been for the freezing conditions we would have not known how succesful it could be. It pays to experiment so just try everything you can with your two flies!
    "So hereís my point. Donít go and get your ego all out of proportion because you can tie a fly and catch a fish thatís dumb enough to eat a car key.." - Louis Cahill - Gink and Gasoline

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Pretoria
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    I would like to derail this thread a little

    In terms of stillwater trout fishing... What are the standard flies - and when are they fished?

    I'm curious as to what's generally used as the safety and when they are used. Like early winter vs late winter (I usually read that you should use smaller flies when it's cold, and darker colours - but conversely the whole bright orange spawning thing???), spring and summer, morning (And what you define as morning? I hear dries are to be fished +- 7-9am) vs closer to noon..

    I know milage will always vary, but I'd like to improve my chances by being in the ballpark first

  5. #15
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    Mar 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
    I would like to derail this thread a little

    In terms of stillwater trout fishing... What are the standard flies - and when are they fished?

    I'm curious as to what's generally used as the safety and when they are used. Like early winter vs late winter (I usually read that you should use smaller flies when it's cold, and darker colours - but conversely the whole bright orange spawning thing???), spring and summer, morning (And what you define as morning? I hear dries are to be fished +- 7-9am) vs closer to noon..

    I know milage will always vary, but I'd like to improve my chances by being in the ballpark first
    Mike, lets not approach this as you have questioned, rather deal with it as it happens.
    Dry fly ff has no time limit to follow, reading the surface will define when you ff dry, sub- surface or deep. This applies all year round.
    Smaller flies generally used with thinner tippets occur mainly in clearer waters, or shallow clear waters.Reading the waters pertaining to fish or insect activity, and or both usually will be the way to go. So it's up to you to know your insects and their life cycles.

    Put it this way, on stillwaters/rivers also, a mayfly hatch can begin and end before the sun is up. Caddis may at first light, but as well as mid morning, but late afternoon is special normally. Then again you have dragons and damsels, as the mornings heat up they emerge.

    Then again, targeting snails etc or chiromid( all year is good) summer or winter.
    Hope this helps a bit, but my view only, could become a pissing contest this.
    Handle every situation like a dog.- If you cant hump it, piss on it and walk away. --JASPER.

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