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Thread: Basic leader setup

  1. #1
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    Default Basic leader setup

    Hi dudes
    Here are some leader specs appropriate for large to medium rivers that I found in another thread. Which specs would you say are the most versatile for your basic dry & dropper or NZ rig and why.
    (The bottom 2 obviously seem too light for the Vaal)

    (line ø) length " "

    (0.5) 100 cm (0.42) 90 cm (0.42) 60 cm
    (0.42) 70 cm (0.32) 60 cm (0.32) 40 cm
    (0.32) 40 cm (0.3) 30 cm (0.3) 25 cm
    (0.25) 15 cm (0.25) 10 cm (0.25) 10 cm
    (0.22) 40 cm (0.22) 30 cm (0.22) 20 cm

    Thanx
    Last edited by Nymph+O-; 13-09-07 at 04:27 PM.
    No PAIN No Gain

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nymph+O- View Post
    Hi dudes
    Here are some leader specs appropriate for large to medium rivers that I found in another thread. Which specs would you say are the most versatile for your basic dry & dropper or NZ rig and why.
    (The bottom 2 obviously seem too light for the Vaal)

    (line ø) length " "

    (0.5) 100 cm (0.42) 90 cm (0.42) 60 cm
    (0.42) 70 cm (0.32) 60 cm (0.32) 40 cm
    (0.32) 40 cm (0.3) 30 cm (0.3) 25 cm
    (0.25) 15 cm (0.25) 10 cm (0.25) 10 cm
    (0.22) 40 cm (0.22) 30 cm (0.22) 20 cm

    Thanx
    Ferdie, I'm no expert as you know, but except for the first one don't the rest seem a bit too short?
    It's not in the catching, it's in the learning something new.
    view albums at. http://www.flytalk.co.za/forum/album.php?u=659

  3. #3
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    Sorry my Friend.

    I cant help you there. As you know a 9ft length of 10lb line from front to back
    The best day to go fishing is any day that ends in a "y"

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herman Jooste View Post
    Ferdie, I'm no expert as you know, but except for the first one don't the rest seem a bit too short?
    Yes, I see it exactly the same but these specs were posted by a big gun in the FF world and I thought if I re-posted it, I might get some clarity
    You are right the first one seem ok but is not even = to 9'???
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  5. #5
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    Why tie your own leader?

    * Hand tied leaders cost pennies on the inch compared to factory made leaders costing up to R15-00 and more.
    * The flexibility to tailor your own leaders to specific fly fishing conditions.
    * The advantage of creating your own tapered leader to match your own style of fly fishing, the way you cast, the type of flies you throw and water conditions versus being stuck with a commercially made leader.
    * It’s much easier and quicker to change and re-tie a new hand-tied leader when the local fishing conditions change.
    * You will get great satisfaction knowing you had direct input on how your fly was presented into fooling your catch just like catching your first fish on your very own hand-tied fly.

    What is a leader and why use one?

    * A leader provides a connection from the fly line to the fly.
    * A leader helps transfer the energy of the fly line to the fly. The fly line is used to transfer and store the energy to carry the fly line, leader and fly during the cast.
    * A leader helps by relieving the energy from the fly line for proper presentation of the fly.
    * A leader lets your fly behave in a life like manner.



    What are the sections of a fly fishing leader?

    Generally there are three basic sections to a tapered leader: Butt, Body and Tippet. One common way to determine length is by using the 50, 25, 25 rule. Use 50% of the total length of the leader for the butt section, then 25% for the body and 25% for the tippet leader sections.

    * Butt – One of the most important sections of the tapered leader formula as it begins the transfer of energy from the fly line to the leader material. Leaders with a diameter near .020” to .026” are good choices to use. Stiffness is another factor to consider in the butt section. A line too limp will make the leader collapse or fold over. A line to stiff will not properly roll the line over and not transfer the energy to the body section.
    * Body - This section contains smaller diameter lines and starts to relieve the energy from the fly line, but at the same time keeping control of the fly for proper presentation.
    * Tippet – Tippet lengths from 16” – 24” is a good guide to follow. Again the smallest diameters of your tapered leader setup down to the lowest breaking strength you are trying to achieve. There are a many specialty tippets from wire leaders for toothy fish to strong shock tippets for hard hitting fish.

    What knots do I use for tying different leader sections together?

    The blood knot or surgeons knots are good for quickly joining two sections together. The Uni-to-Uni knot is one the strongest knots to tie, but takes a little more time to tie. The Uni-to-uni knot keeps two sections of leader material in a more straight and natural line.

    Different types of leader material?


    * Monofilament - Mono line is the most common leader material to use. Mono comes in a variety of sizes, stiffness and diameters. Most leaders are tied using mono because of the variety, diameters, stiffness, and stretch and abrasion resistance.
    * Fluorocarbon – A synthetic material that claims to be nearly invisible under water by having the same refracting index as water. The debate is still going on whether Fluorocarbon is better then mono. Fluorocarbon is good for the last section of tippet on a tapered leader.
    * Mono/Fluorocarbon – A blend of mono and fluorocarbon such as P-Line. The debate is still out on this one as well.
    * Braided Super Lines – A synthetic line made by weaving thin diameter man-made materials to form a no-stretch, low diameter and very strong line. Super lines are usually to limp for leaders, but make good tippet material on short leaders. Use short pieces of braided line with full sinking fly lines and where it's not necessary to have long leaders. Be very cautious when working with braided line because of small diameter, no stretch and strength.

    The different uses of fly fishing leaders:

    * Saltwater fly fishing – Relatively longer with very good transparency. Strong and durable.
    * Northern Pike and Musky fly fishing – Short, strong with cut resistance tippet section.
    * Dry fly fishing – Long and fine tapering leaders.
    * Streamer fishing – Longer heavy butt section to turn over heavier flies.
    * Andronomous (Salmon and Steelhead) fly fishing – Abrasion resistance and strong.
    * Bass fly fishing – Short and strong for thick cover, heavy butts and shorter lengths for turning over big flies that catch a lot of air like divers.

    Other things to think about when building your leader:

    * What type of casting do you like to do such as your cadence and rod length? Do you use fast actions rods or medium action rods.
    * What are the weather and water conditions such as wind or river current?
    * Is the water very clear or dingy and off colored?
    * Are you fly fishing deep water or shallow?
    * What type of fish are you fly fishing for? Northern pike and musky have very sharp teeth, so a wire or thick mono tippet would be needed. You might need a good shock resistance leader for Smallmouth bass that are hard hitters.
    * What is the structure or cover like? Using a highly abrasion resistance line will help around rocks and wood that can very hard on leaders.

    There are many leader tools and leader calculators that try to help you figure out what the best lengths should be for you, like LeaderCalc. Most leader calculator tools and programs start with a base for lengths and tippet diameters and this base is ultimately derived from some other person(s), not you. Some leader calculators do offer recommended lengths and line diameters for certain species of fish and/or type of fly fishing. The best knowledge still comes from your own experience by getting out there on the water experimenting with different types of lines and different lengths.
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  6. #6
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    Arrow

    These look more like small river leaders,or for dirty water.Way to shot for clear water rivers and steams
    Logic can take you from A to B.Imagination can take you everywhere.Your passion is your potential.-Albert Einstein

  7. #7
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    Download your "Leadercalc" here
    It would be of much more help than any other member on this site
    No PAIN No Gain

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nymph+O- View Post
    Hi dudes
    Here are some leader specs appropriate for large to medium rivers that I found in another thread. Which specs would you say are the most versatile for your basic dry & dropper or NZ rig and why.
    (The bottom 2 obviously seem too light for the Vaal)

    (line ø) length " "

    (0.5) 100 cm (0.42) 90 cm (0.42) 60 cm
    (0.42) 70 cm (0.32) 60 cm (0.32) 40 cm
    (0.32) 40 cm (0.3) 30 cm (0.3) 25 cm
    (0.25) 15 cm (0.25) 10 cm (0.25) 10 cm
    (0.22) 40 cm (0.22) 30 cm (0.22) 20 cm

    Thanx
    This doesn't look right. For each leader there are 3 sections listed, but the last 2 sections for each are the same diameter.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nymph+O- View Post
    Hi dudes
    Here are some leader specs appropriate for large to medium rivers that I found in another thread. Which specs would you say are the most versatile for your basic dry & dropper or NZ rig and why.
    (The bottom 2 obviously seem too light for the Vaal)

    (line ø) length " "

    (0.5) 100 cm (0.42) 90 cm (0.42) 60 cm
    (0.42) 70 cm (0.32) 60 cm (0.32) 40 cm
    (0.32) 40 cm (0.3) 30 cm (0.3) 25 cm
    (0.25) 15 cm (0.25) 10 cm (0.25) 10 cm
    (0.22) 40 cm (0.22) 30 cm (0.22) 20 cm

    Thanx
    These are probably from MC Coetzer's thread on French leaders.
    ALL EXCLUDE TIPPET (4X - 6X SECTIONS OF 1m TO 1.5m)

    You need to read these from TOp through BOTTOM (in columns) - thus:
    LEADER 1 - BIG RIVER:
    (0.5) 100 cm
    (0.42) 70 cm
    (0.32) 40 cm
    (0.25) 15 cm
    (0.22) 40 cm
    LEADER 2 - MEDIUM RIVER:
    (0.42) 90 cm
    (0.32) 60 cm
    (0.3) 30 cm
    (0.25) 10 cm
    (0.22) 30 cm
    LEADER 3 - SMALL RIVER:
    (0.42) 60 cm
    (0.32) 40 cm
    (0.3) 25 cm
    (0.25) 10 cm
    (0.22) 20 cm

    Unless you have tried these (using boiled Maxima) and understand what they are for (competition fishing) - don't bother.

    Get 12ft or 9ft tapered leaders to 3X, boil them for 4-5 minutes.
    Add 4X to 6X tippet and fish them (for dry fly/nymph fishing on regular rivers - NOT THE VAAL)
    Gary
    Flytyer - Where great flytying begins

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GGY View Post
    These are probably from MC Coetzer's thread on French leaders.
    ALL EXCLUDE TIPPET (4X - 6X SECTIONS OF 1m TO 1.5m)

    You need to read these from TOp through BOTTOM (in columns) - thus:
    LEADER 1 - BIG RIVER:
    (0.5) 100 cm
    (0.42) 70 cm
    (0.32) 40 cm
    (0.25) 15 cm
    (0.22) 40 cm
    LEADER 2 - MEDIUM RIVER:
    (0.42) 90 cm
    (0.32) 60 cm
    (0.3) 30 cm
    (0.25) 10 cm
    (0.22) 30 cm
    LEADER 3 - SMALL RIVER:
    (0.42) 60 cm
    (0.32) 40 cm
    (0.3) 25 cm
    (0.25) 10 cm
    (0.22) 20 cm

    Unless you have tried these (using boiled Maxima) and understand what they are for (competition fishing) - don't bother.

    Get 12ft or 9ft tapered leaders to 3X, boil them for 4-5 minutes.
    Add 4X to 6X tippet and fish them (for dry fly/nymph fishing on regular rivers - NOT THE VAAL)
    Tanks you for clearing this one up for us Gary
    No PAIN No Gain

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